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Surgery To Correct Deviated Septum

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yelloownumber5

Question

I was denied deviated septum on a claim because of no evidence of trauma.

I had surgery septolasty to fix this deviated septum while on active duty, shouldn't I be able to claim deviated septum since it wasn't straightened out from surgery and still having problems?

Also I have contact with one person that seen me after I totalled a military van and had nasal problems since but I'm not sure what all they should say in the witness statement. They did come to the seen as I was on duty but just trying to ensure the VA doesn't dismiss this because all that is in my record is a bill from the Naval Hospital to Navy Legal who had them draw a urine and blood test for drugs. Nothing else was done except cleaned up and given some pain meds.

There is referrence to the car accident in my SMR but only by me telling doctors. Why would I lie about this accident 15 years before I even knew what a VA claim was? I also have a cateract that the eye doctor said is due to trauma or possibly can't remember the wording but it did say "X" amount of years ago. I guess they can tell about how long ago it was.

I am also SC'd for allergic rhinitis (0 %) but having a problem finding someone to give an IMO for this. Nobody has said yes or no, they just don't want to do it.........can anyone recommend a doctor for an IMO's other than Dr. Bash? Dr. Bash is stuck on his price that I cannot afford.

Thanks much,

Edited by yelloownumber5
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I know I've asked a similar question in the past but this is what I've been trying to get an answer to.........

I know the Va can do about whatever they want but.

If I have sleep apnea now and if it can be connected back to my in service could they deny my claim because the cause of sleep apnea is a deviated septum which is not

proven to be service connected.

Just trying to know me not being able to service connect my deviated septum and as the sleep doctor said it's not the primary contributor but secondary would you think they would deny my claim because of this.

Mentally, I cannot think and the VA has screwed up my head, I'm sorry if I seem to break this down to too many pieces but your guidence is truly appreciated/

Thanks.

Edited by yelloownumber5
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I am SC for a fractured nasal bone and deviated septum due to trauma, the Obstruction is at least 50% obstruted on both sides, yet I only have very mild symptoms of sleep apnea. so mild it is hardly worth mentioning. A deviated septum can be a contributing factor or it may not be a factor at all in someone who has sleep apnea. An ENT specialist in sleep apnea can make a determination as to what is the cause of your sleep apnea and how much your deviated septum plays in to it. I would try to pin down the major cause of your sleep apnea before I make a claim for it. Then if your deviated septum is not that much of a factor or a factor at all, you will then have an argument against the VA should they denie on the sole basis of your deviated septum.

An ENT IMO is in your best interest if your looking for documentation in your favor.

Rockhound Rider :blink:

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Rockhound,

I did have surgery (septoplasty) before I retired from the military to straighten that non service connected deviated septum.

I will just ask the ENT again what he thinks and see if he will do an IMO.

Thanks.

I am SC for a fractured nasal bone and deviated septum due to trauma, the Obstruction is at least 50% obstruted on both sides, yet I only have very mild symptoms of sleep apnea. so mild it is hardly worth mentioning. A deviated septum can be a contributing factor or it may not be a factor at all in someone who has sleep apnea. An ENT specialist in sleep apnea can make a determination as to what is the cause of your sleep apnea and how much your deviated septum plays in to it. I would try to pin down the major cause of your sleep apnea before I make a claim for it. Then if your deviated septum is not that much of a factor or a factor at all, you will then have an argument against the VA should they denie on the sole basis of your deviated septum.

An ENT IMO is in your best interest if your looking for documentation in your favor.

Rockhound Rider :blink:

Edited by yelloownumber5
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Rockhound,

I did have surgery (septoplasty) before I retired from the military to straighten that non service connected deviated septum.

I will just ask the ENT again what he thinks and see if he will do an IMO.

Thanks.

Question? Is their any medical evidence that can possibly show that your original Deviated Septum was exacerbated/made worse by the surgery you had in the service? If you can show this, then you may be able to SC it as having been made worse by the military Dr's beyound what would have been normally expected for such a condition/injury/or congenital malformation. That is so long as the deviated septum results in an obstruction of the nazel passages of at least 50% or at 100% of one side.

Your IMO would have to specify that the deviated septum meets this criteria and that the results of the surgery made it at least as likely as not, this bad, That you would have been just as likely as not better off, with a deviated septum causing less of an obstruction without the surgery.

Get my meaning? The best you can probably get, would be a 10% rating, even though the deviated septum's severity was due to a bad surgical procedure, the VA would probably look at it as due to trauma. IMHO

If you can SC the deviated septum, you can then consider it as a contributing factor to your sleep apnea condition then, if your ENT IMO agrees with my logic, that is.

Good luck.

Rockhound Rider :blink:

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Rockhound,

"Question? Is their any medical evidence that can possibly show that your original Deviated Septum was exacerbated/made worse by the surgery you had in the service?"

When on active duty they asked a few months after the surgery and I didn't believe it helped, I also remember the surgeon telling me that this would not help my labored breathing.

C&P Examiner did note that I feel my septum is worse after surgery. The C&P examiner diagnosis "recurrent sinusitis and allergic rhinitis in spite of recent septoplasty for correction of deviated septum."

I'm not sure they would say the septoplasty surgery made my septum worse since they say it'd "mildly" deviated post surgery vs. serious deviation pre surgery. I also have comments about tiredness, fatigue, and all thate prior to the surgery so I don't know. But I will try.

I have 3 recorded forhead trauma in my medical record but nobody put deviated septum.....one was a car accident that was totalled. One even says inner eye lid which is like right on my eye lid but the VA dismissed this because no deviated septum from trauma.

This is what has me trying to figure something out. Aug 2003 while on active duty surgery to correct my deviated septum, 2004 C&P says it's "Midline"

Sept 2005 ENT says it's straight, May 2007 ENT (different one) says it's "slight rightward bowing of the nasal septum." I know "slight" is relative but if I have not have any trauma since

surgery and only 39-42 during those times........any ideas what would make the septum do this, does it become weaker after surgery?

The sleep doctor assessment was "This patient has mild to moderated sleep apnea syndrom primarily on the basis of excessive body weight with contributions from nasal obstruction and mandibular retrodisplacement. There may be an element of insomnia."

I had braces when I was younger with an overbite, also he did note about deviation to the right side.

Also do you know much about Serum amyloid A (SAA) protein, they did note on the lab speciem that i had this in my nasal cartilage not sure if that is normal or not nor who to address that with.

Question? Is their any medical evidence that can possibly show that your original Deviated Septum was exacerbated/made worse by the surgery you had in the service? If you can show this, then you may be able to SC it as having been made worse by the military Dr's beyound what would have been normally expected for such a condition/injury/or congenital malformation. That is so long as the deviated septum results in an obstruction of the nazel passages of at least 50% or at 100% of one side.

Your IMO would have to specify that the deviated septum meets this criteria and that the results of the surgery made it at least as likely as not, this bad, That you would have been just as likely as not better off, with a deviated septum causing less of an obstruction without the surgery.

Get my meaning? The best you can probably get, would be a 10% rating, even though the deviated septum's severity was due to a bad surgical procedure, the VA would probably look at it as due to trauma. IMHO

If you can SC the deviated septum, you can then consider it as a contributing factor to your sleep apnea condition then, if your ENT IMO agrees with my logic, that is.

Good luck.

Rockhound Rider :blink:

Edited by yelloownumber5
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