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    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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allan

White Matter Brain Lesions

Question

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allan,

Thanks for the post - I just wish I could understand

all of the medical lingo better.

carlie

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It's very difficult Carlie,

It took me years of researching & looking up definitions of the medical terms.

I could not understand why the VAMC Dr's would keep down playing the lesion in the corpus collosum & wouldn't discuss it. One neurologist said I shouldn't worry about that. He said it's healing well.

A lesion in the corpus collosum is specific for MS, not TBI.

Anyone with neurological symptoms should study their diagnostic tests like MRI's & catscans very carefully.

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It's very difficult Carlie,

It took me years of researching & looking up definitions of the medical terms.

I could not understand why the VAMC Dr's would keep down playing the lesion in the corpus collosum & wouldn't discuss it. One neurologist said I shouldn't worry about that. He said it's healing well.

A lesion in the corpus collosum is specific for MS, not TBI.

Anyone with neurological symptoms should study their diagnostic tests like MRI's & catscans very carefully.

allan,

I'm still trying to figure out if my brain atrophy is associated with my TBI,

if there will continue to be more atrophy, the effects it has had

over the years and if I will deteriorate more due to it.

carlie

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"Anyone with neurological symptoms should study their diagnostic tests like MRI's & catscans very carefully."

I agree. I believe some doctors (mine didn't) don't discuss all the findings of an MRI with their patients. My doctor only discussed c6 with me and wrote a prescrip. for physical therapy for it. I received my MRI report online and to me it seems a lot more is going on. Any thoughts on this report? Thank you.

FINDINGS: There is diffuse straightening of the cervical spine. Normal

bone marrow, cord caliber, cord signal, and inferior intracranial

structures.

--C3-C4, left greater than right mild to moderate uncovertebral joint

degenerative disease and small posterior disc bulge cause mild bilateral

neural foraminal stenosis. Negative for spinal stenosis.

--C4-C5, uncovertebral joint degenerative disease and left greater than

right facet degenerative disease cause mild left neuroforaminal stenosis.

--C5-C6, posterior disc bulge with superimposed right paracentral and

foraminal protrusion moderately narrows the spinal canal. There is no

cord signal abnormality at this level. Severe right and mild left neural

foraminal stenosis.

--C6-C7, broad posterior disc bulge effaces ventral CSF without

contacting the ventral thecal sac. Negative for spinal stenosis or neural

foraminal stenosis.

--C7-T1, there is no evidence of disk bulge or neural foraminal

narrowing.

IMPRESSION: C5-C6 posterior disc bulge and superimposed right paracentral

and foraminal protrusion moderately narrows the spinal canal and causes

severe right neural foraminal stenosis; this corresponds with a right C6

radiculopathy. No C5-C6 cord signal abnormality.

P.S. The cervical spine was part of my claim but I didn't have this report yet.

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[allan,

I'm still trying to figure out if my brain atrophy is associated with my TBI,

if there will continue to be more atrophy, the effects it has had

over the years and if I will deteriorate more due to it.

carlie ]

Carlie,

im sure i've posted medical information showing brain atrophy is associated with TBI. Recheck the TBI section.

As for will it continue to atrophy? You should get a consult with a neurologist to get those answers. I know that doesn't ease the fear, but it may be the best way to find out.

Allan

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