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Follow Up To Recent Radio Show With Dr Harch (Tbi)


Berta

Question

This is to follow up on some information from Dr. Paul Harch, our recent Blog Radio Guest:

http://www.hbot.com/

Regarding TBI:
http://www.hbot.com/hbot-brain-trauma

the information also regardseveruything from PTSD to Cancer, stroke,
wound healing (such as in diabetics)
multiple sclerosis, CFS, and many other disabilities that he has used Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy on.


The hyperbaric Oxygen chambers were traditional used for divers with the bends.

The radio show reveals a small part of how Dr. Harch realised the benefits of this type of therapy for treating a multitute of disabilities.

"As he evaluated divers with brain DCI presenting for primary treatment weeks to months after their accident or with residual brain injury following neurological plateau on the standard U.S. Navy recompression protocol, it became obvious he was treating ischemic (low blood flow) brain injury and not residual gas. This was unequivocally confirmed in 1990 and 1991 with two diving cases, a 43 year old demented commercial diver 7 months after injury and 5 months after U.S. Navy treatment plateau, and a 33 year old demented junior high school math teacher, misdiagnosed and committed to a psychiatric hospital after a diving accident and then aborted suicide attempt. Following a call to Dr. Neubauer in April, 1990, Dr. Harch began treating the first diver and eventually achieved clinical, psychometric, and SPECT brain blood flow improvement. The second diver experienced normalization of his EEG, complete recovery of neurological function and a 22 point recoup of his pre-accident IQ before the end of his treatment protocol. He returned to work and obtained a masters' degree in educational psychology. Today, he is actively employed by the State of New Mexico, testing educationally handicapped children. Dr. Harch reported these cases and subsequent others at scientific meetings (1, 2)."

This is not a costly adventure into this type of therapy.

But the VA seems uninterested in what this could mean to veterans suffering from TBI residuals and PTSD.
It could mean young OIF OEF vets would have a chance to potentially become rehabilitated enough to provide their families with substantial wages,or if not a good working life left, to provide those veterans with some relief from the incredible affects of TBI residuals that can warrant them unable to work at all.

The information is very compelling and as Jbasser discussed, these oxygen chambers can be easily transported to VA medical centers. Hope I got that right John...need to hear the show again.....

VA only seems to want to treat symptoms and has overlooked many types of treatment issues and advanced studies regarding all sorts of disabilities,that could improve the lives of veterans, even if they cannot work again due to the SC disability they have.

Dr Harch can be reached at the links above for anyone interested.

I am stioll stunned that IAVA didnt give him much interest.

IAVA is for Iraq/Afghanistah veterans, the ones who might wellneed this type of medical research and treatment the most...for the "Signature Wound" of OEF, aka TBI.

They didnt even know what TBI was during Vietnam War and countless incountry personnel probably suffered from a TBI that never even got a chance to see a corpsman about it, because

once they came to, it was back to the fight.

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