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Cervical ROM

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Jim412

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Can anyone explain this to me? I understand it’s my neck’s ability to move but does it meet the requirement for a rating assuming service connection?

Cervical ROM:           Degrees
Flexion                         40/65 
Extension                       20/50   with pain as a limiting factor
Right lateral flexion           20/45   with pain as a limiting factor
Left lateral flexion            20/45   with pain as a limiting factor
Right Rotation                  60/80 
Left Rotation                   60/80 
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You have to look at the rating criteria. I quoted just the rating percentage section for the spine, but there are several additional notes which contain additional details.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/38/4.71a

Quote

For 40%: Unfavorable ankylosis of the entire cervical spine; or, forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine 30 degrees or less; or, favorable ankylosis of the entire thoracolumbar spine

For 30%: Forward flexion of the cervical spine 15 degrees or less; or, favorable ankylosis of the entire cervical spine

For 20%: Forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine greater than 30 degrees but not greater than 60 degrees; or, forward flexion of the cervical spine greater than 15 degrees but not greater than 30 degrees; or, the combined range of motion of the thoracolumbar spine not greater than 120 degrees; or, the combined range of motion of the cervical spine not greater than 170 degrees; or, muscle spasm or guarding severe enough to result in an abnormal gait or abnormal spinal contour such as scoliosis, reversed lordosis, or abnormal kyphosis

For 10%: Forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine greater than 60 degrees but not greater than 85 degrees; or, forward flexion of the cervical spine greater than 30 degrees but not greater than 40 degrees; or, combined range of motion of the thoracolumbar spine greater than 120 degrees but not greater than 235 degrees; or, combined range of motion of the cervical spine greater than 170 degrees but not greater than 335 degrees; or, muscle spasm, guarding, or localized tenderness not resulting in abnormal gait or abnormal spinal contour; or, vertebral body fracture with loss of 50 percent or more of the height

 

I am going to assume that on each range, the first number is where pain began and the second is max ROM. I am not sure if they are still required to rate on where pain begins, but let's assume they are.-

On 4/25/2023 at 8:44 AM, Jim412 said:

Can anyone explain this to me? I understand it’s my neck’s ability to move but does it meet the requirement for a rating assuming service connection?

Cervical ROM:           Degrees
Flexion                         40/65 
Extension                       20/50   with pain as a limiting factor
Right lateral flexion           20/45   with pain as a limiting factor
Left lateral flexion            20/45   with pain as a limiting factor
Right Rotation                  60/80 
Left Rotation                   60/80 

Added together, the combined cervical range with pain is 220 (the left numbers). Based on what you posted, it looks like it might qualify for 10%. However, check the text I italicized under 20% because that has to do with abnormal curvatures of the spine. That might be documented or checked off elsewhere in your exam.

Of course, you would need to get SC status for your neck. Don't overlook reasonably common issues secondary to cervical disabilities like headaches, nerve issues, depression from the pain, plus side effects of medications used to treat your SC disabilities.

I hope this helps you out. Others will likely advise, too...

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