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Hypertension & Ptsd


RichL

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Is there a connection between PTSD and hypertension? I was diagnosed by the VA with PTSD when I returned from OIF. I have been awarded 30% for this PTSD by the VA. I was also diagnosed with hypertension. I recently filed a claim with the VA for the hypertension. It was my understanding that if you are diagnosed with hypertension with in a year of discharge, then it would be considered service connected. The VA denied my claim last week, since there was no record of hypertension while I was on active duty. Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I can get this service connected?

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Rich- here is one of some of the BVA decisions granting Hypertension as secondary to PTSD-

http://www.va.gov/vetapp05/files2/0510693.txt

As you can see it takes, clear medical evidence- a statement from a doctor -that associates the HBP with the PTSD- as within this claim.

What you mentioned is interesting- within 38 USC 1112 (a) there are numerous chronic disease that- if manifested to 10% within one year after discharge, they are presumptively service connected.

Hypertension, as I understand this regulation- seems to have to be associated with cardiac renal disease- as cause or etiology of the hypertension.

However- this veteran had in service readings that supported her claim:

"Service connection for certain chronic disorders such as

hypertension may also be established based on a legal

"presumption," by showing that the chronic disorder

manifested itself to a degree of 10 percent or more within

one year from the date of separation from service. 38

U.S.C.A. § 1112(a)(1) (West 2002); 38 C.F.R. §§ 3.307(a),

3.309(a) (2004).

Applicable VA regulation requires that hypertension or

isolated systolic hypertension be confirmed by readings taken

two or more times on at least three different days. 38

C.F.R. § 4.104, Diagnostic Code 7101, Note 1 (2004). The

term "hypertension" means that the diastolic blood pressure

is predominantly 90mm, or greater, and "isolated systolic

hypertension" means that the systolic blood pressure is

predominantly 160mm or greater, with a diastolic blood

pressure of less than 90mm. See 38 C.F.R. § 4.104,

Diagnostic Code 7101, Note 1 (2004).

VA regulation further provides for a 10 percent rating for

hypertension when the diastolic pressure is predominantly

100mm or more, or the systolic pressure is predominantly

160mm or more, and also in those cases where the individual

has a history of diastolic pressure predominantly 100mm or

more and requires continuous medication for control. 38

C.F.R. § 4.104, Diagnostic Code 7101 (2004).

In essence, the veteran contends on appeal that she developed

hypertension while serving in the Persian Gulf area between

November 1990 and June 1991, that her hypertension" -------from

http://www.va.gov/vetapp05/files2/0511713.txt

Have you yourself looked over your military records good for any HBP readings? I never believe what the VA says are in or not in SMRs.

Edited by Berta
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Barbi what supporting literature from the appellant was submitted by your husband to go along with the doctors statement that it is more likely than not aggravated by PTSD, , the VARO denied mine based on MY VA doctor wasn't a board certified cardiologist, yet she is the cardioligist that I am assigned to for regular treatment she is not an intern she is employed by the VA and MCG I submitted the studies from the National Center for PTSD that states there is a relationship to hypertension and PTSD and the VARO called it internet garbage lol it's their site lol my case is still on appeal if it is not awarded as a SC condition I will appeal it to BVA but I am just curious what documents your husband did submitm my cardioligist wrote a great lettter ask Berta she didn't say likley as not she said more likely than not so on my C&&P exam they never addressed hypertension or arthersclerosis they just said there is no literature that supports CAD being secondary to PTSD no but there is lots of literature showing artherscleroctic heart problems and hypertension being related I had a stroke at 36 first heart attack at 39 and triple bypass at 41 2 bypasses failed at age 45 and have been disabled and fighting with the VA ever since lol they ought to figure out I am not quitting until I get the 100% P&T and it has to include SC for heart disease or hypertension at least after 7 heart attacks eventually one of them is going to get me. the odds speak for themselves

that was all based on a June 05 C&P I just had a new C&P in Jan and this one said my smoking history and obesity led to my artheriosclerosis and heart attacks and stroke except he never looked in the records at the time I had the stroke and heart attacks I was 36 and weighed 175 pounds I was not obese I was still in the National Guard and was not in the "fatmans program" so there went that theory he really should of had my C File there for the exam, as he called my arthersclerosis was premature but it wasn't because I was obese lol I got obese after I became totally disabled in 2000 I use to be a mailman and walked 15 to 19 miles a day and then no excercise wow I ballooned up to 258 now I am down to 225 I still want to lose the 25

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I currently have a claim in for my husband for SC hypertension. On his medical exam paper when he entered the military, it showed his BP in the normal range. On his discharge medical exam paper it showed an elevated BP. Even the AHA and the AMA both showed that the BP reading was considered hypertension and should have been watched closely. The VARO initially denied the claim because the word "Hypertension" was not noted on the discharge medical exam. They totally ignored the BP reading. He finally got a C & P exam which stated that his current HBP was related to his military service. This claim is still being processed at the VARO and is a remanded claim back from the BVA. Don't know what the outome will be. The claim has been on remand from the BVA for a year and the C & P exam was done several months ago. I certainly would have thought that we would have heard something by now. But, this claim is 6 years old, so I guess we are used to the wait.

mssoup

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Do you have a copy of the C & P results?

Have you asked your SO or vet rep what is what?

Or you could call 1-800-827-1000 fir the status but I suggest that you also ask them to check the COVERS screen to see the physical whereabouts of the claim-

If this doesn't help I suggest you go to the BVA web site and under Benefits there is a Query Section with menus and you could ask them for the status-

the good part of this email system is that you get a hard copy response from the VARO-might take a few days- could be sooner than that-

I am actually using two hard copy VA query responses to support my claim- if I need them-

They prove the examiner who gave a report on my claim -that was both positive and negative- did not have the veteran's medical records -her sec asked for a few to be faxed to her but the entire med files-with the most probative evidence - was over 100 miles away when she did her report-

my query responses prove that.

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The Same thing happened to me. I had in service Elevated BP readings and the VA lost my Service Medical record and could not locate it for 10 years. The Claims were denied because of no information availablle in t he SR. In 1998 they found the record and I reopened the claim. Again denied for the service medical record failed to mention any hypertension.( RO SAID). I had a C and P exam last December and guess what I found. I found the Hypertension as well as headaches in the Service Medical record on the Summary page.

The RO has been tap dancing around with this claim for 3 years. I am awaiting a decison before I slap a CUE on them for the origional date due to negligence of the RO not considering the entire service record.

I have it typed up and I am waiting for the decision. As the presumptive rule for Hypertensiopn. It has to be compensable within the first year. I have readings taken at 8 / 11 /12 months after service and all have distolic readings over 100.

Testvet, The Medical records at or near the time of your stroke should contain your weight. If you have copies of them submit them. I wonder if you can file a cue claim for a bogus opinion on a c and p exam.

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