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Sinus Bradycardia Question


yelloownumber5
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Question

When I went for my sleep study two years ago.......the test said "sinus bradycardia". My PCM nor VA PCP did not say a word. When I had the VA PGW physical's EKG nothing came up. Does anyone have first hand experience with this.......I've looked up some things and it seems to need attention but maybe I'm not able to explain all to my doctor so they figure the "no big deal".

Background

High Blood pressure about 130/90 on meds which I did read some BP meds cause this sinus bradycardia

Thryoid issues

Of course Sleep Apnea (OSA they said)

My daytime resting Heart Rate will go anywhere from 60 to 90's but usually around high 60's to 80.

Thanks in advance,

Yelloow#5

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The VA seems very clueless in cardiac issues. I have a history of SVT (sinus ventriclular tacycardia) or a very fast heart-rate. In the real world I've had 2 surgeries to correct this and now I'm back on meds. The condition is under control. Maybe too well because as of late Ive developed what you have. A much, much too low heart rate. In the 40's-50's. My PCP's opinion was....and I quote "that is normal for a woman your age"....I"m only 44. That isn't normal.

My PCP refuses to refer me to cardiology! I wish I had an answer....other than I truly understand.

Do you have other symptoms? Keep a log perhaps 2-3 times a day of your heart rate for a couple of weeks and turn that in to your PCP and the nurse....along with your blood pressure and any symptoms you might be feeling. Just a thought.

Hope you feel better...

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When I went for my sleep study two years ago.......the test said "sinus bradycardia". My PCM nor VA PCP did not say a word. When I had the VA PGW physical's EKG nothing came up. Does anyone have first hand experience with this.......I've looked up some things and it seems to need attention but maybe I'm not able to explain all to my doctor so they figure the "no big deal".

Background

High Blood pressure about 130/90 on meds which I did read some BP meds cause this sinus bradycardia

Thryoid issues

Of course Sleep Apnea (OSA they said)

My daytime resting Heart Rate will go anywhere from 60 to 90's but usually around high 60's to 80.

Thanks in advance,

Yelloow#5

I have sinus bradycardia (low rate rate). My heart rate went down to 19 bpm in 1997 before a cardiac pacemaker was implanted. The resting pulse rates you mentioned do not seem alarming.

Sinus bradycardia can be defined as a sinus rhythm with a resting heart rate of 60 beats per minute or less. However, few patients actually become symptomatic until their heart rate drops to less than 50 beats per minute.

Mine was in the 30ies and 40ies during the last few years in the Army--I thought it was due to me being in great shape--I ran marathons and other races of shorter distance.

I suspect bradycardia was mentioned or cited because your heart rate did go as low as 60. However, that is barely breaking the threshold for bradycardia. Off hand, I don't think it qualifies for SC compensation unless a pacemaker is required. I could be wrong...

Good luck,

Ron

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Purple,

Thanks. I will ask my VA PCP to see cardiology. I have high blood pressure.......but the sleep study cited the low heart rate while sleeping but while awake it's in the "normal" range.......personally, I wouldn't be too worried IF the sleep doctor said something but since they DID NOT say anything it has me wondering why. I have to find my sleep study and ensure it was not the "sick" sinus.

As Ron II says it might not be something to worry about, however, it is not "normal" but when the VA says your EKG, ECG are "normal" then 20 years later when you are in a world of crap what do you do to help out with your disability...........Ron II that was and is my concern, it's not about today but the tomorrows.

Thanks Purple I will get on them again! My wife has Tacycardia from her Thyroid removal now she is Hyperthyroid.

The VA seems very clueless in cardiac issues. I have a history of SVT (sinus ventriclular tacycardia) or a very fast heart-rate. In the real world I've had 2 surgeries to correct this and now I'm back on meds. The condition is under control. Maybe too well because as of late Ive developed what you have. A much, much too low heart rate. In the 40's-50's. My PCP's opinion was....and I quote "that is normal for a woman your age"....I"m only 44. That isn't normal.

My PCP refuses to refer me to cardiology! I wish I had an answer....other than I truly understand.

Do you have other symptoms? Keep a log perhaps 2-3 times a day of your heart rate for a couple of weeks and turn that in to your PCP and the nurse....along with your blood pressure and any symptoms you might be feeling. Just a thought.

Hope you feel better...

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It's good you're getting it checked out now. Mine didn't cause problems until six years after I left the Army.

BTW, I was still working (desk job) when my heart rate was in the 19-26 bpm range. I don't recommend it for anyone. B)

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Ron is correct no worry and no claim. Any time they run and ekg and it detects a heartbeat in the 60 range it spits out a

"sinus bradycardia warning otherwise normal ekg reading". The doc simply throws the chart in your file and goes on with life.

The worry part - none. If you happen to have cardiac artery disease and they prescribe a med such as IMDUR it keeps your heart rate in the 50 to 60 level.

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Ron is correct no worry and no claim. Any time they run and ekg and it detects a heartbeat in the 60 range it spits out a

"sinus bradycardia warning otherwise normal ekg reading". The doc simply throws the chart in your file and goes on with life.

The worry part - none. If you happen to have cardiac artery disease and they prescribe a med such as IMDUR it keeps your heart rate in the 50 to 60 level. Mine ticks in the 55-58 range. You just have to be careful and not get up from a sitting position to fast. That makes you a little bit fuzzy headed for a couple of mins. B)

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