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Jim MAC

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I have a claim in for asbestos poisoning and received a letter from the VA asking what chemicals I used in the service. I was a Jet Engine mechanic/ crew Chief. I know I was exposed to JP4, JP5, fuel 7808, 23669 oil hydraulic fluid pd 680 and trkie but I can not think of any thing else right now does anybody have the list of chemicals used by Aircraft mechs in the service?

Thanks,

Jim

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  • HadIt.com Elder

go to the EPA superfund site and look at the bases you were stationed they should have a list of every chemical found in the ground before the Love Canal the services dumped everything into the dirt, all bases have listings of toxic materials good hunting http://www.epa.gov/superfund/

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Jim,

To reveal that information would be a breach of security.You know that.. B)

In reality though, do you actually have asbestos posioning? How was that tested...

Oh yes,, It is very possible that if you were around the airfield/ship in a area where brakes being removed, installed,, High concentrations can be seen in the lungs from inhaled dust.

Edited by Josh (see edit history)
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Jim,

To reveal that information would be a breach of security.You know that.. B)

In reality though, do you actually have asbestos posioning? How was that tested...

Oh yes,, It is very possible that if you were around the airfield/ship in a area where brakes being removed, installed,, High concentrations can be seen in the lungs from inhaled dust.

Josh

The asbestos poisioning was found during a gulf war phyiscial by the VA found scaring on my lungs from the asbesotoes.

Jim

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Hello Jim,

I have a few things that may help show exposure................

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES: Biochemistry

Pro-Oxidant Biological Effects of Inorganic Component of Petroleum: Vanadium and Oxidative Stress

http://www.stormingmedia.us/64/6470/A647063.html

Authors: Janusz Z. Byczkowski; Arun P. Kulkarni; MANTECH-GEOCENTERS JOINT VENTURE DAYTON OH

Abstract: Crude oil contains significant amounts of inorganic compounds of vanadium. Air Force, Army, and Navy personnel are exposed to vanadium compounds in the air, on the land, and on the sea, wherever petroleum fuel is used. Inorganic residue of fly ash resulting from combustion of some fuels may contain almost exclusively vanadium oxides. Unlike organic pollutants, vanadium is not biodegradable and it may build up in certain ecosystems to the level which may be toxic to living organisms. It has been estimated that as much as 66,000 tons of vanadium is released into the atmosphere each year. Particularly dramatic effects on the environment may result from massive incidental and/or intentional spilling of vanadium-containing crude oil into relatively confined ecosystems, as well as from massive oil burning. In addition to the vanadium exposure at the work place, the general population is also exposed increasingly to this metal, mostly as a result of increased utilization of vanadium-containing petroleum fuels. Vanadium-bearing particles may persist in the lungs for may years, raising the risk of chronic health effects. This report contains a review of the extensive literature on biochemical mechanisms of action of vanadium compounds, as well as the authors' own perspective, resulting from about two decades of laboratory research. This report provides information about adverse biological effects of vanadate, vanadium pentoxide, vanadyl, and other vanadium derivatives present in petroleum or formed during the fossil fuel combustion, on oxidative stress, cellular signal transduction, subcellular organelle functions, and on a possible interaction with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and chemical co- carcinogenesis.

Limitations: APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE

Description: Interim rept. Oct 95-Aug 96

Pages: 38

Report Date: AUG 1996

Report number: A647063

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1.5 How can fuel oils affect my health?

We know very little of the human health effects caused by fuel oils. Daily use of a kerosene stove for cooking should not cause any breathing problems for most people. People who use kerosene stoves to cook do not have more colds than people who have other types of stoves. Breathing moderate amounts of deodorized kerosene (fuel oil no. 1) has been shown to slightly affect the ability to smell and to cause a taste sensation. Numerous case-studies have reported accidental poisoning in children as the result of drinking kerosene. These accidents are probably much more frequent in areas where kerosene is commonly used for cooking and heating. Drinking kerosene may cause vomiting, diarrhea, swelling of the stomach, stomach cramps, coughing, drowsiness, restlessness, irritability, and unconsciousness; also, it may be difficult to breathe, and breathing may be painful. Coughing, pneumonia, and difficult or painful breathing after drinking kerosene suggest that kerosene has entered the lungs. In addition, drinking large amounts of kerosene can put you into a coma, cause convulsions, and may even cause death. When kerosene gets on your skin for short periods, it can make your skin itchy, red, and sore; sometimes blisters may occur and your skin may peel.

Breathing fuel oil no. 1 vapor for periods as short as 1 hour may make you feel nauseous, increase your blood pressure, be irritating to your eyes, or make your eyes bloodshot. Breathing kerosene or JP-5 vapors can also affect your nervous system. Some of the effects that have been noted in case studies include headache, light-headedness, anorexia (loss of appetite), poor coordination, and difficulty concentrating. Breathing diesel fuel vapors for a long time may damage your kidneys, increase your blood pressure, or lower your blood's ability to clot. Constant skin contact (for example, washing) with diesel fuel may also damage your kidneys.

It appears that repeated contact with fuel oils can cause skin cancer in mice and may cause liver cancer in mice. However, there is some conflicting information. Further, the fuel oils were tested only on mice. We do not know if fuel oils can cause cancer in humans. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has determined that residual (heavy) fuel oils and marine diesel fuel are possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B classification). In addition, IARC considers that there is not enough information (Group 3 classification) available to determine if distillate (light) fuel oils or distillate (light) diesel fuels cause cancer. They have also determined that occupational exposures to fuel oils during petroleum refining are probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A classification). We do not know if fuel oils can cause birth defects or if they affect reproduction.

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/phs75.html#bookmark05

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Jet Fuel Exposure Damages Balance

NEW YORK, July 23 (Reuters) -- Researchers say long-term occupational exposure to jet fuel can damage the sense of balance. The study findings may have serious implications for the safety of military pilots and ground crews.

"Jet fuel exposure may be associated with adverse health effects to the neurological system," concludes a study led by scientists from the United States Air Force's (USAF) Armstrong Laboratory at Brooks Air Force Base in Texas.

The study is published in the current issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

The USAF researchers say experts have long recognized that high-level, short-term exposure to jet fuel fumes can produce neurological effects such as "staggered gait, slurring of speech, headaches, nausea, and mental confusion." But the long-term health effects of occupational jet fuel fume inhalation has remained unclear.

The military researchers sought to determine those effects. They selected 30 USAF employees working on air bases in sectors such as jet engine repair, engine testing, fuels maintenance, and fuels distribution. The 30 employees had worked in such areas an average of 12 years (none for less than 6 months).

These employees were asked to take part in highly sensitive, computerized balance testing. Neurological experts believe postural balance testing "provides a unique 'biological marker' of environmental chemical-associated changes" in the function of the central nervous system.

The balance-test results of the exposed employees were compared to those of 25 individuals who did not have regular exposure to jet fuel.

The scientists also took samples of work-environment air, to measure levels of jet fuel fumes in specific air base occupational areas.

They say their study "demonstrated a positive relationship between changes in postural balance... and exposure to constituents in jet fuel." And the investigators say balance deteriorates with increasing years of exposure.

While much of this exposure is low-level and subtle, some work scenarios pose greater fume-ingestion hazards. The USAF experts point out that jet fuel fumes naturally collect within the space available in half-empty tanks. When workers open the lids to such tanks (to check fuel levels, for instance), they often directly inhale dangerous gases.

But just how severe is this cumulative damage to the sense of balance? Not strong enough to be immediately noticeable, researchers admit, but strong enough to endanger workers in certain situations. "This could be a significant safety factor for personnel working around aircraft in dark areas, or on slippery (oil, water, ice) or compliant surfaces (mud, soft soil.)," they say.

Their study did not include tests on those individuals who actually fly the military's supersonic jets. Yet the USAF experts point out that pilots are themselves routinely exposed to jet fuels and engine exhaust. They point to a 1986 European study which found that individuals exposed to jet fuel had 'visual tracking' test scores 50% lower than those without such exposures. "These findings become even more important," the researchers contend, "when viewed in the context of flying at supersonic speed, where minute degradation to any neural pathway could be catastrophic."

They suggest that annual balance testing be included in regular medical exams of military personnel. Such examinations are aimed at assessing performance readiness and eligibility.

SOURCE: The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (1997:39(7):623-632)

http://www.personalmd.com/news/a1997072307.shtml

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""

Department of Veterans Affairs Memorandum

Date: May 13, 2002

From: Mary M. Parker

Subj: Asbestos claims

To: PIES Coordinators, Military Records Specialists Thru: Veterans Service Center Managers CC: Gloria Hamly, Naval Sea Systems Command

1. This memo is intended to spell out, as clearly as possible, what VA PIES users at all field stations need to do when they receive a response to request code 016 [ASBESTOS - FURNISH RECORDS OF EXPOSURE IN SERVICE OR JOBS VETERAN PERFORMED] from the VA PIES Unit at NPRC.

2. First, some background. Cases involving asbestos exposure generally relate to Navy veterans who were exposed to asbestos while working on Navy ships. The service record does not usually contain documents stating specifically whether or not the veteran was exposed to asbestos. So, VA PIES Unit personnel used to make copies of pages from the service record showing assignments, and transfers and receipts, which they sent to the Navy liaison office at code 13 (NPRC), where one of the Navy liaison staff would review some charts and provide a statement regarding probability of exposure to asbestos, based on ratings the service person held while in service. The Navy liaison Office is no longer staffed to perform this duty in response to VARO (PIES) requests. Consequently, we have developed new procedures for handling asbestos cases.

3. In response to an 016 request, VA PIES Unit personnel at NPRC will continue to either make copies of records stating the veteran was exposed to asbestos, or if no such documents can be found, make copies of pages from the service record showing assignments, and transfers and receipts. They will then post response code # 1 (requested documents mailed/faxed) in PIES and send the photocopies directly to the appropriate VA Regional Office.

4. Regional Offices should refer to the attached chart which shows Navy Job Titles (Ratings) and Probability of Exposure to make determinations regarding the likelihood of exposure. If, for any reason, more details regarding rate descriptions or more rates are needed, you may also go

..." "'h", """,I1",..,i"",.. ........h ...i..."". hH...../Ih. ....."".....",.1 "'"""h..."J",..., ""....,., mil/h. "'" . .....,.1+/""""", """...+,.1/('\""...+,.1 ....rIf

5. For assistance in unusual cases, such as a negative determination which leads to a Board of Veterans Appeals remand or congressional follow. up, the Military Records Specialists at each station may contact Gloria Hamly at the following address: Commander, Naval Sea Systems Com'mand, Attn: OTP (G Hamly), 1333 Isaac Hull Ave. S.E. Stop 1210, Washington Navy Yard, D.C. 20376-1210, or via or e-mail: Hamlygp@navsea.navy.mil for assistance. Please be sure to furnish as much information as possible : name, service number, social security number, assignments, transfers, receipts, ratings, etc. to assist her in her search.

6. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Mary Parker via Exchange or telephone 314-538-4296.

/s/ MARY M. PARKER ENCLOSURE

JOB TITLES PROBABILITY (AA) Airman Apprentice Minimal (ABE) Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Launch&RecEquip) Probable (ASF) Aviation Boatswain's Mate Probable (ASH) Aviation Boatswain's Mate, Aircraft Handler) Probable (AC) Air Traffic Controller Minimal (ACM) Aviation Chief Metalsmith Probable (ADJ) Aviation Machinist's Mate (Jet Engine Mechanic) Probable ADR) Aviation Machinist's Mate Probable (AE) Aviation Electrician's Mate Probable (AFCM) Aircraft Maintenanceman (Master Chief) Minimal (AG) Aerographer's Mate Minimal (AK) Aviation Storekeeper Minimal (AM) Aviation Structural Mechanic Probable (AME) Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) Probable (AMH) Aviation Structural Mechanic-Hydraulics Probable (AMS) Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structural) Probable (AN) Airman Minimal (AO) Aviation Ordnanceman Minimal (AQ) Aviation Fire Control Technician Highly Probable (AR) Airman Recruit Minimal (ARM) Aviation Radioman Probable (AS) Aviation Support Equipment Technician Probable (AT) Aviation Electronic Technician Probable (AW) Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Operator Probable fAX\ A\li!::atinn .o.nti~lIh \J\/~rf~ro To...hni...i....n D.."h....hl"

Page 2 of 4

Page:

(AZ) Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Minimal (B) Boilermaker (WWII) Highly Probable (BU) Builder Probable.

(BM) Boatswain's Mate Minimal (BR) Boilermaker Highly Probable (BT) Boiler Technician Highly Probable (CD) Construction Driver Probable (CE) Construction Electrician Probable (CM) Construction Mechanic Minimal (CN) Construction man Probable (Cox) Coxswain Minimal (CS) Commissaryman Minimal (CT) Communication Technician Minimal (CTR) Cryptologic Technician (Collections) Minimal (DC) Damage Control man MinimCilI (DK) Disbursing Clerk Minimal (DP) Data Processing Technician Minimal (DS) Data System Technician Minimal (DT) Dental Technician Minimal .4WEM Ele. ctrician's Mate Probable (EN) Engineman Probable Eqllipment Operator Minimal (ET) Electronics Technician Probable ~ Fire Controlman Highly Probable ~ Fireman Highly Probable (FP) Pipefitter Highly Probable (FT) Fire Control Technician Highly Probable (FTG) Fire Control Technician (Guns) Highly Probable (GM) Gunner's Mate Minimal (GSM) Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) Probable (HC) Hospital Corpsman Minimal (HN) Hospitalman Minimal (HT) Hull Maintenance Technician Highly Probable (IC) Interior Communication Technician Probable (1M) Instrumentman Highly Probable (LI) Lithographer Minimal (M)(ME) Metalsmith Minimal (MA) Master-At-Arms Minimal (MLC) Molder Probable (MM) Machinist Mate Probable (MN) Mineman Minimal (MOMM) Motor Machinist Mate Probable (MR) Machinery Repairman Minimal (MS) Mess Management Specialist Minimal (MT) Missile Technician Probable (MU) Musician Minimal (NC) Navy Counselor Minimal (OM) Opticalman Minimal (OS) Operations Specialist Minimal (PC) Postal Clerk Minimal (PJ...I\ PhotoaraDher's Mate Minimal

Page 4 of 4

(PHM) Pharmacist Minimal (PN) Personnelman Minimal (prtr) Printer Minimal (PT) Photographic Intelligenceman Minimal (PTR) Painter Probable (QM) Quartermaster Minimal (RO) Radarman Minimal (RM) Radioman Minimal (RN) Radarman Minimal (SC) Ship's Cook Minimal (SO) Stewart Minimal (SF) Shipfitter Minimal (SFM) Shipfitter (Metal Smith) Minimal (SFP) Shipfitter (Pipefitter) Minimal (SH) Ship's Serviceman Minimal (SK) Storekeeper Minimal (SM) Signalman. Minimal (SN) Seaman Minimal (SO) Sonarman Highly Probable (SoM) Sound man Highly Probable (ST) Sonor Technician Highly Probable (STG) . Sonar Technician (Surface) Highly Probable (SOG) in 60's (STS) Sonar Technician (Submarine) Highly Probable (StM) Steward's Mate Minimal (SW) Steelworker Probable (T A) Stewart Apprentice Minimal (TO) Trademan Minimal (TE) Teletype Minimal Torpedoman's Mate Probable (TN) Stewardsman Minimal (UT) Utilitiesman Highly Probable (Wf) Water Tender. Highly Probable IV\ VQnm~n Minimal

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Thank for all yout help I apreaicate it.

Jim

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