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usneyetech

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I joined the Navy in 1981 & got out in 1987. VEAP (veterans educational assistance program) was offered at the time. This was between the old GI bill & the new GI bill.Financially, it was a bad deal for the vet. You paid $2,700.00 into a fund & after you got out of the service & went to college later, you would recieve a total of $8,100.00 total for your college expenses. Full time students would recieve $300.00 per month, part time got $150.00 per month. I went part time & $150.00 per month didn't go very far. I went to college sporadically over the years, but got good grades. I was "volunteered" to be an eyetech (ophthalmic tech) my second year as a corpsman due to the "needs of the Navy". When I got out I became an optician because it was what I knew. I tried to go to college part time & work full time but after struggling with both, I was unable to get a degree, so I have in essence, from ages 19 to 49, 7 colleges I have attended ( three I attended while in the Navy).

In 2006, I had two hip surgeries on the same hip. In 2008 I had another one on the same hip & recently had the fourth. Hopefully this is the last one.

I am currently receiving SSDI after the fourth surgery and I am looking forward to getting back to work. However, I am now a single parent & need to make more money. I am tired of treading water & sinking!! Opticians in Texas don't make much, even experienced ones. To get to my question: How do I go about getting decent financial aid to go back to college & finish what I started?

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I was VEAP, ugh, it was a bad ponzi scheme and not a college plan. I did the math after six months and realized it was a waste of money.

First, with Vocational Rehabilitation, the mission is not to send you to college. the goal is to find you employment. College and training comes into play if that is required to find you employment suitable to your disability. This goes for all vocational rehabilitation programs.

OK. Since you are disabled, your state's vocational rehabilitation office is a starting point. The State run programs are funded by federal matching money, which means they are underfunded. You are on ssdi so you should fall into the Ticket to work, but again it will depend on the funding status.

As far as the VA side.. It is a great program, and you a 10% rating so you can apply for it ( though I have heard 10% is very difficult ).. I think your issue is that the obstacle to employment is not your VA disability, but your other issues.. But you should talk to a legal authority before applying, call your local VA regional office and find out which service organizations have reps working there.. MOPH, DAV, VFW, AL.. make an appointment and go in and talk to them. They will know the vocrehab people in your VARO and will be able to tell you if you have a shot..

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Texas Veterans who have exhausted benefits can use Hazelwood Act and get free tuition at any College or Institution that is supported by State or Local Government.

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Your service connection is listed as 10%. You have 12 years from date of VA Compensation award to apply for VA Vocational rehabilitation. However, at 10%, you must have a serious service connected employment handicap. Also, check with your home state Vocational Rehabilitation program for possible benefits.

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Your service connection is listed as 10%. You have 12 years from date of VA Compensation award to apply for VA Vocational rehabilitation. However, at 10%, you must have a serious service connected employment handicap. Also, check with your home state Vocational Rehabilitation program for possible benefits.

Thanks guys, (airborne 18, pete 53, & vmo), the information was very helpful. Now I just have to try to locate a "live person" at the Texas voc rehab office. :lol:

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