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Medical Records

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Berta

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If you cannot afford an IMO , at least try to get someone with some medical background to review them for you.

Many of us have nurses, EMTS, and medical students in our families or know someone with some background in medicine.

And the internet itself has made this easier to do than ever- to help us understand medical notations in symbols and how to read Blood chem reports etc.

The award I just got from BVA goes back to 1994 with a potential back to 1988.

It is for direct service connected death of my husband due to AO (from DMII diabetes Type II with complications of DMII causing death)

Neither the symbols or words 'DMII' nor 'diabetes mellitus' ever appears in Rod's entire VA medical records.

Only one abbreviation (DVD) and one entry that was very difficult to read "cf diag"

followed by 'fingerstick to R/O' contained the initial basis for my claim.

My prior Section 1151 DIC award was based on these four entries:

"RO CAD" ,"WU next week for CAD" , "diaphoretic" , "It is in the 1988 records"

Also these few entries were the basis of my award under FTCA.

Of course there was more evidence then this that I found-the EKGs etc- but my point here is-

these were the sole medical entry written documentations from VA that I had found -which triggered all of my claims -all awarded-

Medical records need to be thoroughly read over and understood for many of our claims.

Often only a real doctor can do that for us.

Bu the internet has made it easier for all of us to understand what these records reveal.

It is worth it to take the time to get familiar with your medical records even if your claim seems obvious and easy to award and rate.

Older handwritten VA medical entries often have to be blown up on a scanner or even read through a mirrior to decifer them.Entries that are crossed out should be carefully considered if you can still read what they crossed out.

Medical symbology is for the most part the same today as it was in your SMRS. All symbology can be decifered through many medical web sites.

You can learn how to interpret an EKG and even CT scans and MRIs by accessing numerous medical sites on the web.

All entries by any medical person in our VA medical records are clues to succeeding in many of our claims.

Many claims certainly do not need this detailed investigation of what the records reveal -yet many denials are based on a VA rater or C & P doctor)certainly not taking the time necessary to study the whole record -and this is something it pays to do ourselves.

VA will not connect the dots on anything unless it is obvious and takes them little time to do.

And their is nothing better then sending them copies of your own records highlighted and then expalined as to how the specific entries or test results support you claims.

or having a real doctor do that in a well prepared IMO.

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I totally agree with Bertha. I made numerous copies of my records and I highlight the important evidentuary material. Make sure you go over every piece of evidence in your file. I found wrong dates typed on my discharge papers. I had serviced connected injuries and type on my discharge papers were dates months prior to the actual injuries. Also the examiner did not sign the form.

IT IS IMPERITIVE TO CHECK THEM ALL BUT PAY PARTICULAR ATTENTION, AS BERTA ADVISES, TO THE MEDICAL DOCUMENTATION,(sorry for caps). Medical terminology and symptomology can make or break a claim. Bertha found in Rod's chart a notation something to this effect ...that his bs(blood sugar)was very high, yet no one acted upon that nor did they do further tests to establish a diagnosis of diabetes...unfortunately she lost her dear husband, due to a variety of medical mistakes. So highlight it, or write it on a piece of paper and look it up! If you can't read it ask a medically oriented/educated person for help.

This is your life, and you must do everything to fight for your rights. Follow the info on the vets sites for help with claims, and look up cases that have prev gone through BVA with similiar diag and read the evidence brought forth in them too.

If you cannot afford an IMO , at least try to get someone with some medical background to review them for you.

Many of us have nurses, EMTS, and medical students in our families or know someone with some background in medicine.

And the internet itself has made this easier to do than ever- to help us understand medical notations in symbols and how to read Blood chem reports etc.

The award I just got from BVA goes back to 1994 with a potential back to 1988.

It is for direct service connected death of my husband due to AO (from DMII diabetes Type II with complications of DMII causing death)

Neither the symbols or words 'DMII' nor 'diabetes mellitus' ever appears in Rod's entire VA medical records.

Only one abbreviation (DVD) and one entry that was very difficult to read "cf diag"

followed by 'fingerstick to R/O' contained the initial basis for my claim.

My prior Section 1151 DIC award was based on these four entries:

"RO CAD" ,"WU next week for CAD" , "diaphoretic" , "It is in the 1988 records"

Also these few entries were the basis of my award under FTCA.

Of course there was more evidence then this that I found-the EKGs etc- but my point here is-

these were the sole medical entry written documentations from VA that I had found -which triggered all of my claims -all awarded-

Medical records need to be thoroughly read over and understood for many of our claims.

Often only a real doctor can do that for us.

Bu the internet has made it easier for all of us to understand what these records reveal.

It is worth it to take the time to get familiar with your medical records even if your claim seems obvious and easy to award and rate.

Older handwritten VA medical entries often have to be blown up on a scanner or even read through a mirrior to decifer them.Entries that are crossed out should be carefully considered if you can still read what they crossed out.

Medical symbology is for the most part the same today as it was in your SMRS. All symbology can be decifered through many medical web sites.

You can learn how to interpret an EKG and even CT scans and MRIs by accessing numerous medical sites on the web.

All entries by any medical person in our VA medical records are clues to succeeding in many of our claims.

Many claims certainly do not need this detailed investigation of what the records reveal -yet many denials are based on a VA rater or C & P doctor)certainly not taking the time necessary to study the whole record -and this is something it pays to do ourselves.

VA will not connect the dots on anything unless it is obvious and takes them little time to do.

And their is nothing better then sending them copies of your own records highlighted and then expalined as to how the specific entries or test results support you claims.

or having a real doctor do that in a well prepared IMO.

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I just got some copies of my actual EKG readouts for previous years from the VA. In my records, the narrative report states that all of my EKGs and Holter monitors (24-hr EKGs) have been "normal". Upon review of my actual EKGs.....wow. The complete opposite is true. They confirm I've had sick sinus syndrome for several years and the idiot VA cardiologists either were too stupid to dx it.....or just didn't care.

Yes, I'm gathering info for 1151 action as well as a Tort Claim.

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