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Psychology Thesis Of Ptsd, Please Help Me.


PsychStudent

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Hello everyone, I just want to introduce myself and hopefully have some help. I am a college student who is writing my senior research project on PTSD. I am writing about resilience and the social construct of the military, and trying to find a way to lower the risk of our soldiers obtaining PTSD.

I have created a survey in which I ask anyone who is willing to help with this research to take.

In this survey I will not require your name or any information that may lead to who you are. And if the survey creates some unpleasant feelings, please stop and do not push yourself.

And for the moderators, I apologize if this is not allowed, if it is not please message me letting me know how, or if I am able to conduct this experiment.

Here is the survey https://qtrial2014.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_5nkUEcaifJCDv25 And I ask that only VETERANS take this survey.

Thank you so much for your help, and I will be more than happy to answer any questions.

Edited by PsychStudent
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Hello everyone, I just want to introduce myself and hopefully have some help. I am a college student who is writing my senior research project on PTSD. I am writing about resilience and the social construct of the military, and trying to find a way to lower the risk of our soldiers obtaining PTSD.

I will be setting up a survey in which I hope someone will participate in, so that I can collect data and see if I can form a thesis and continue my research. I am required to turn in a participant list of who is willing to take part of the study, so if you would let me know just so I have something to turn in I would be very appreciative.

In this survey I will not require your name or any information that may lead to who you are. And if the survey creates some unpleasant feelings, please stop and do not push yourself.

And for the moderators, I apologize if this is not allowed, if it is not please message me letting me know how, or if I am able to conduct this experiment.

For now we will let this topic fly, but keep it moderated.

If you make the choice to reply and or participate, it is at your own risk.

Always beware of providing any of your personal information.

Admin

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For now we will let this topic fly, but keep it moderated.

If you make the choice to reply and or participate, it is at your own risk.

Always beware of providing any of your personal information.

Admin

Thank you so much. I will be putting up a mock-up of my consent for tomorrow, and it will be included in the survey.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

I am not a veteran.

I did many thesis on the Vietnam War for my degree. PTSD was a specific part of one or two of them.

I referred in my work, to one of the greatest commanders in military history, Julius Caesar, who centuries ago, looked for severe signs of anxiety and depression in his men after battle campaigns, often debriefing his men himself.

You could google his Books on the Gallic wars and perhaps under a search find how he handled the early manifestations of what we now call PTSD.

Audie Murphy,the incredivle war hero, had 'battle fatigue' and 'shell shock' but years later he was finally diagnosed with PTSD,when this horrific disability finally had a name that made sense.

One cannot separate PTSD from the Vietnam War because there are many reason for it's high prevalance in Vietnam combat vets.

Part of that reason is this....(so unlike past wars)

A lack of proper debriefing in the field....In the field... I cannot stess that point enough.

Vietnam vets when their DEROS was up came home on planes with strangers....other combatants but from different units.....many never got contact info from their buddies when they left Vietnam....and .many didnt want to find out if their buiddies still there, had died there.

receptions from often a Very Ungrateful nation that started even at airports when they arrived home

the lack of family support and understanding for what they were experiencing and needed to talk about

A 'world' (the USA) that had gone crazy during their year TDY...miny skirts, free love, peaceniks,anti war protesters, blame the vet for the war crap ( like My Lai)

A fear of other war veterans , and of the VA, a fear of having gone crazy amd a fear of telling anyone that.... A fear of even being in uniform.

A complete lost of innocence ,for most Vietnam vets,serving in combat during their teen years, who were trained to take lives halfway around the world for a war that our government did not properly prepare for......nor ever consider it's vast consequences....nor comprehend how militarily adept the enemy was.

'Resilience and construct'

"I am writing about resilience and the social construct of the military," right there is a profound opening thesis statement.

"Trying to find a way to lower the risk of our soldiers obtaining PTSD."

That is why I mentioned Julius Caesar. He considered the long term ramifications of his Army and Navy personnel and the fact that they would return home from battle, resting but only to be preparing for the next one.

Caesar's war Veterans in those days received all medical care free, they lived tax free, and their communities gave them and their families all the food they could ever need.

One could say their service was a permanent lifetime occupation, and they were treated with respect that our veterans never seem to always get.

Wars since Vietnam have brought our men and women in service far more types of challenges like IEDS, etc and the new 2010 PTSD regulations account for the 'fear of hostile activity" which was for decades, never part of the old PTSD criteria.

And PTSD can come from many non combat service situations as well and is equally just as devastating to those who have it , as combat PTSD is.....

Good luck with your thesis.........Maybe even a vet center would allow you to talk to some PTSD vets there with their permission.


Edited by Berta
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