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    • In July of '15, I appealed a denial of service connection for a R shoulder condition. I submitted actual copies of a shoulder injury from my Navy medical record, along with evidence of surgeries in 200 and 2015 done by non-VA doctors. At the same time, I filed for an increase in my cervical spine condition. Of course, nothing has happened yet, but it appears that the VA has lumped the two together as one "appeal." I submitted the paperwork under the direction of my NSO. I'm sure this question has been addressed here periodically, but I'd like a fresh opinion:
       As time goes by, I continue to be treated, tested, injected, etc. for both of these conditions; they are getting worse and worse and the NSO is encouraging me to go for and IU claim, but I still want to try to work. Also recently lost my wife to cancer so i'm the only income anymore. I've been told that submitting additional evidence causes your claim or appeal to go back to the beginning of the process. Is this true? Also, does the VA, when they do get around to looking at my appeal, automatically go through my record and look for information pertaining to my claim? I began using the VA system exclusively last fall, so the new information should be readily at hand. Do I have to go through and pick it out and submit it to them as supporting documentation, or will they find it on their own? If I need to submit, then it goes back to my question above; am I just moving my appeal father away from being considered? Aside from that, I recently got a favorable 10% for tinnitus. I was already at 90% and the new award doesn't push me to 100, but i guess it always helps to document it. Considering a subscription - these ads are a killer and make using the site a lot more confusing to me. Thanks for all the work you do, all of you! Jim
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Fire Courage

Elevated Liver Enzymes

24 posts in this topic

Just curious if anyone has had elevated liver enzymes. Mines have been elevated since I've been going to the VAMC back in 1996. I filed a claim on undiagnosed illness for it but of course it was denied. They've tested me for everything! They have ruled out everything it could possibly be and finally gave it a name. They are now calling it non-alcoholic steatohepatitis of the liver. I've had a liver biopsy at the VAMC and it showed fatty deposits. I have never been a big drinker; just an occassional beer every now and again.

Has anyone had elevated liver enzymes and were you able to connect it to service?

Edited by Fire Courage

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Have they checked your thyroid?

TSH tests are normally what they do but you should see an Endo doc if you have hypothyroid symptoms and for more testing. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000353.htm

your TSH tests can come back normal like mine have for years. If you have many symptoms of hypothyroid keep telling your doctor hopefully even if the tests are "normal" they will get you to an Endo for much more testing....if that is the problem. It is just very much overlooked.

I wouldn't accept the easy answer of "fatty liver". I hope you look into it.

For your claim I cannot help ya with that.

On the side note many PGW Vets have thyroid problems. Lots of neurotoxins there and as well with our fake food and substitutes.

Just curious if anyone has had elevated liver enzymes. Mines have been elevated since I've been going to the VAMC back in 1996. I filed a claim on undiagnosed illness for it but of course it was denied. They've tested me for everything! They have ruled out everything it could possibly be and finally gave it a name. They are now calling it non-alcoholic steatohepatitis of the liver. I've had a liver biopsy at the VAMC and it showed fatty deposits. I have never been a big drinker; just an occassional beer every now and again.

Has anyone had elevated liver enzymes and were you able to connect it to service?

Edited by yelloownumber5

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Fire Courage:

Do you drink? Elevated SCOT test usually indicate liver damage. No matter what the cause you need to stop drinking till you get a plan of action.

Good Luck

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Fire Courage....

The "itis" means inflammation.....the "stea" is pertaining to fat deposits in the liver.

If you are diabetic, it can cause fatty liver which could elevate your enzymes....Hepatitis will also, certainly they did check for Hepatitis.

You would have to have a "diagnosis" for sc.....fatty liver can be residuals from a few different things.

If you do a google search for gastro disease or fatty liver, it should bring up some articles for you to review.

As yellownumber mentions, you should look into it....maybe it is thyroid related. Best bet, do a little research and see you doctor.

Good luck to you.

Did a quick google serach......for "Fatty Liver and elevated liver enzymes" - came up with this.....

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH is a common, often “silent” liver disease. It resembles alcoholic liver disease, but occurs in people who drink little or no alcohol. The major feature in NASH is fat in the liver, along with inflammation and damage. Most people with NASH feel well and are not aware that they have a liver problem. Nevertheless, NASH can be severe and can lead to cirrhosis, in which the liver is permanently damaged and scarred and no longer able to work properly.

NASH affects 2 to 5 percent of Americans. An additional 10 to 20 percent of Americans have fat in their liver, but no inflammation or liver damage, a condition called “fatty liver.” Although having fat in the liver is not normal, by itself it probably causes little harm or permanent damage. If fat is suspected based on blood test results or scans of the liver, this problem is called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). If a liver biopsy is performed in this case, it will show that some people have NASH while others have simple fatty liver.

Both NASH and NAFLD are becoming more common, possibly because of the greater number of Americans with obesity. In the past 10 years, the rate of obesity has doubled in adults and tripled in children. Obesity also contributes to diabetes and high blood cholesterol, which can further complicate the health of someone with NASH. Diabetes and high blood cholesterol are also becoming more common among Americans.

I'm not a doctor, you should check with your own physician about this.

Edited by VetsLady

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Fire Courage:

Do you drink? Elevated SCOT test usually indicate liver damage. No matter what the cause you need to stop drinking till you get a plan of action.

Good Luck

Pete,

Thanks for the response. As stated before, just an ocassional beer every now and again. Which is about a beer every few weeks sometimes longer. I know sailors have been known to drink till they drop, but I have never been a big drinker.

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Thanks for the response and the info. I'm aware of what NASH is and have been seen in the GI Clinic for some time now(Since 1996). I've gotten lots of info about it from the doctors as well as google searches. Yes, they have ruled out hepatitus and many others. I'm also not a diabetic, although my mom, and grandmother had it and my sister now has it. I'm going to look into possible thyroids though. Thanks yellownumber for that info.

The main reason for my post was to see if anyone else had NASH and was able to connect it to service. I have been searching the net for cases and found one but it was connected secondary to service-connected diabetes mellitus.

Here is the link. http://www4.va.gov/vetapp03/Files/0320760.txt

Thank God I don't have diabetes and pray I don't get it. But, it may be in my future....

Fire Courage....

The "itis" means inflammation.....the "stea" is pertaining to fat deposits in the liver.

If you are diabetic, it can cause fatty liver which could elevate your enzymes....Hepatitis will also, certainly they did check for Hepatitis.

You would have to have a "diagnosis" for sc.....fatty liver can be residuals from a few different things.

If you do a google search for gastro disease or fatty liver, it should bring up some articles for you to review.

As yellownumber mentions, you should look into it....maybe it is thyroid related. Best bet, do a little research and see you doctor.

Good luck to you.

Did a quick google serach......for "Fatty Liver and elevated liver enzymes" - came up with this.....

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH is a common, often "silent" liver disease. It resembles alcoholic liver disease, but occurs in people who drink little or no alcohol. The major feature in NASH is fat in the liver, along with inflammation and damage. Most people with NASH feel well and are not aware that they have a liver problem. Nevertheless, NASH can be severe and can lead to cirrhosis, in which the liver is permanently damaged and scarred and no longer able to work properly.

NASH affects 2 to 5 percent of Americans. An additional 10 to 20 percent of Americans have fat in their liver, but no inflammation or liver damage, a condition called "fatty liver." Although having fat in the liver is not normal, by itself it probably causes little harm or permanent damage. If fat is suspected based on blood test results or scans of the liver, this problem is called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). If a liver biopsy is performed in this case, it will show that some people have NASH while others have simple fatty liver.

Both NASH and NAFLD are becoming more common, possibly because of the greater number of Americans with obesity. In the past 10 years, the rate of obesity has doubled in adults and tripled in children. Obesity also contributes to diabetes and high blood cholesterol, which can further complicate the health of someone with NASH. Diabetes and high blood cholesterol are also becoming more common among Americans.

I'm not a doctor, you should check with your own physician about this.

Edited by Fire Courage

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