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Jerrel
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Yep I think that is what it was for sure..hehe

Jerrel svr

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The Department of Defense (DoD) is providing this information, at the request of the Department of

Veterans Affairs (VA), to assist the VA in providing healthcare services to qualified veterans and to

assist veterans in establishing service connection for disability claims. The Deployment Health

Support Directorate (DHSD) collected this information from multiple sources and requested that the

military services declassify it to allow its public distribution. The VA accepts this information

provided on location, dates, units and/or ships, and substances involved in this exercise, which

DHSD extracted from classified DoD records, and will provide it to individual veterans as necessary,

but the VA cannot verify its accuracy.

Office of the

Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs)

Deployment Health Support Directorate

FACT SHEET

For more information

(703) 578 - 8500

(800) 497 - 6261

Version 10-09-2002

Deseret Test Center

Elk Hunt, Phase I

Shortly after President Kennedy’s inauguration in 1961, the Secretary of Defense,

Robert McNamara, directed that a total review of the U.S. military be undertaken. The study

consisted of 150 separate projects. The chemical and biological warfare review was known

as Project 112. As part of the Project 112 review, the Joint Chiefs of Staff convened a

working committee that recommended a research, testing, and development program for

chemical and biological weapons. To oversee this program, the Deseret Test Center was

established at Fort Douglas, Utah, in 1962. Both land-based and ship-based tests were

conducted during the period 1962 – 1973. The Deseret Test Center closed in 1973.

The Elk Hunt, Phase I tests were designed to determine the amount of either standard or

modified VX nerve agent picked up on the clothing of personnel traversing various types

of contaminated terrain. The tests examined the length of time a barrier is effective in

producing casualties. Elk Hunt, Phase I also compared pickup of agent when M23 mines

filled with standard and modified VX nerve agent were detonated under water and under

ground.

In Elk Hunt, Phase I, standard or modified VX nerve agent was disseminated from M23

mines detonated under ground in three types of terrain – shrubbery, wooded, and ground

covered in rye grass – and under water. Personnel, assuming various tactical positions,

traversed the contaminated test grids at specified times and the amount of VX picked up on

their clothing was measured. Personnel wore complete, impermeable, butyl-rubber outfits

and M9A1 masks.

Twenty trials were conducted in the vicinity of Fort Greely, Alaska from July 3 through

August 15, 1964.

The Department of Defense (DoD) is providing this information, at the request of the Department of

Veterans Affairs (VA), to assist the VA in providing healthcare services to qualified veterans and to

assist veterans in establishing service connection for disability claims. The Deployment Health

Support Directorate (DHSD) collected this information from multiple sources and requested that the

military services declassify it to allow its public distribution. The VA accepts this information

provided on location, dates, units and/or ships, and substances involved in this exercise, which

DHSD extracted from classified DoD records, and will provide it to individual veterans as necessary,

but the VA cannot verify its accuracy.

ELK HUNT, PHASE I

2-2-2-2

Test Name Elk Hunt, Phase I (DTC Test 65-14)

Testing Organization US Army Deseret Test Center

Test Dates July 3 – August 15, 1964

Test Location Fort Greely, Alaska

Test Operations To determine the amount of either standard or

modified VX nerve agent picked up on the

clothing of personnel traversing various types of

contaminated terrain. To determine the length of

time a barrier is effective in producing casualties.

To compare pickup of agent when M23 mines

filled with standard and modified VX are

detonated under ground and under water.

Participating Services US Army, Deseret Test Center personnel

Units and Ships Involved Selected personnel assigned to HHC,

171st Infantry Brigade, 15th Artillery Battalion,

40th Armor Battalion, 4th Battalion,

9th Infantry, 1st Battalion, 47th Infantry,

538th Ordnance Company (Direct Support)

Dissemination Procedures Standard or modified VX was disseminated from

M23 mines detonated under ground and under

water.

Agents, Simulants, Tracers VX Nerve Agent

Modified VX Nerve Agent

(one percent polyisobutyl-methacrylate added

as thickener)

Ancillary Testing Not identified

Decontamination Not identified

The Department of Defense (DoD) is providing this information, at the request of the Department of

Veterans Affairs (VA), to assist the VA in providing healthcare services to qualified veterans and to

assist veterans in establishing service connection for disability claims. The Deployment Health

Support Directorate (DHSD) collected this information from multiple sources and requested that the

military services declassify it to allow its public distribution. The VA accepts this information

provided on location, dates, units and/or ships, and substances involved in this exercise, which

DHSD extracted from classified DoD records, and will provide it to individual veterans as necessary,

but the VA cannot verify its accuracy.

ELK HUNT, PHASE I

3-3-3-3

Potential Health Risks

Associated with Agents,

Simulants, Tracers

VX Nerve Agent – (Synonyms: Phosphonothioic

acid, VX)

VX nerve agent is extremely lethal. It is an oily

liquid that is clear, odorless, and tasteless. Death

usually occurs within 10-15 minutes after absorption

of a fatal dosage. VX nerve agent is one of the most

toxic substances ever synthesized. Symptoms of

overexposure may occur within minutes or hours,

depending upon the dose. They include: constriction

of pupils, headaches, runny nose, salivation,

tightness in the chest, nausea, vomiting, anxiety,

difficulty in thinking, muscle twitches, tremors,

and weakness. With severe exposure, symptoms

progress to convulsions and respiratory failure.

There is little information available regarding the

long-term human health effects of exposure to low

doses of VX.

(Sources: Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention http://www.bt.cdc.gov/Agent/Nerve/VX/

ctc0006.asp [as of January 25, 2002]Zajtchuk R

(ed.), Textbook of Military Medicine (part 1,

Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare,

1997), Office of the Army Surgeon General,

Washington DC, 1997. SBCCOM Online,

Edgewood Chemical Biological Center

http://in1.apgea.army.mil:80/RDA/msds/vx.htm

[as of April 2, 2002] World Health Organization,

Department of Sustainable Development &

Environmental Protection, http://209.61.192.180/

phe/factsheet_5.htm [as of April 2, 2002]

Department of the Army Pamphlet 40-8:

Occupational Health Guidelines for the Evaluation

and Control of Occupational Exposure to Nerve

Agents GA, GB, GD, and VX

http://books.army.mil:80/cgi-bin/bookmgr/BOOKS/

P40_8/CCONTENTS [as of February 5, 2002])

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