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Trochanteris Pain Syndrome


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What is the prime medical condition that this is related to?

The few BVA cases I searched only refer to this syndrome , in regards to bilateral hip problems, as the main cause.

 

 

 

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I found this about it

What is the treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome?

Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is usually self-limiting. That is, it usually goes away on its own in time. However, it commonly takes several weeks for the pain to ease. Symptoms can persist for months, and sometimes longer in a small proportion of cases. However, persistence does not mean that there is a serious underlying condition or that the hip joint is being damaged.

Decreasing activity such as running or excessive walking for a while may help to speed recovery. In addition, the following may be useful:

Applying an ice pack (wrapped in a towel) for 10-20 minutes several times a day may improve your symptoms.

Taking paracetamol or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen may help to reduce the pain.

Losing weight. If you are overweight or obese then losing some weight is likely to improve your symptoms.

Injection of steroid and local anaesthetic. If the above measures do not help then an injection into the painful area may be beneficial.

Physiotherapy. If a steroid injection does not improve your symptoms then you may be referred to a physiotherapist. They will be able to give you advice on improving your flexibility and strengthening your muscles.

If the condition is severe or persistent then you may be referred to a specialist for advice regarding further treatment.

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Further reading & references

Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (trochanteric bursitis); NICE CKS, October 2010

Williams BS, Cohen SP; Greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a review of anatomy, diagnosis and treatment. Anesth Analg. 2009 May;108(5):1662-70.

Strauss EJ, Nho SJ, Kelly BT; Greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Sports Med Arthrosc. 2010 Jun;18(2):113-9.

McMahon SE, Smith TO, Hing CB; A systematic review of imaging modalities in the diagnosis of greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Musculoskeletal Care. 2012 Dec;10(4):232-9. doi: 10.1002/msc.1024. Epub 2012 Jul 4.

Disclaimer: This article is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. EMIS has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. For details see our conditions.

Original Author:
Dr Louise NewsonCurrent Version:
Dr Colin Tidy Peer Reviewer:

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I am thinking it would fall under the 

 Musculoskeletal  Symptoms.  in the CFR'S 

but I am not sure?

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I believe the ratings for this type condition is 0% to 50%   10-20-30- 40 & 50

50% being the most severe.

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Thanks for your response; the primary condition is hip pain/stiffness. My claim of hip pain secondary to flat feet was denied. However, the c & p Doc did provide a diagnosis of Trochanteric Pain Syndrome but with no service connection. Based on my research a shorten lower limb (leg) is a contributing factor to Trochanteric pain. I was diagnosed/advised that my left leg is shorter than my right and have copy of it. So, my question is should I file a rebuttal or a new claim for Trochanteric Pain Syndrome.

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Hip Pain and stiffness is a symptom , not a diagnosis of a disability.

What is your SC rating for flat feet?

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