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Depression & Alcoholism Secondary To Ptsd?


MikeS

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Hi all:

After my claim was approved for tdiu t&p fot ptsd, my DAV rep told me, "Now that you're getting paid at the 100% rate, if you don't bother the va they won't bother you".

After the ptsd reviews that almost happened, I see that his words were false and misguided.

Anyway, my va docs have always said that i got depression from the ptsd.

Also, the va primary care doc knows from blood tests that I have been drinking.

Should I file a new claim for depression and alcoholism secondary to ptsd??

Thanks

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Good question Mike, I feel that most vets are scared to admit the amount of drinking they do, because they don't want to be labeled an alcoholic instead of the VA recognizing that in many cases the alcohol is a remedy to the PTSD.

I know when I went for my PTSD C&P I didn't say anything about my drinking. Truth is I still use it as a crutch. I also was evaulated for Major Depressive Disorder during my C&P but my award had nothing to do with it. Only stated the PTSD>

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Hi all:

After my claim was approved for tdiu t&p fot ptsd, my DAV rep told me, "Now that you're getting paid at the 100% rate, if you don't bother the va they won't bother you".

After the ptsd reviews that almost happened, I see that his words were false and misguided.

Anyway, my va docs have always said that i got depression from the ptsd.

Also, the va primary care doc knows from blood tests that I have been drinking.

Should I file a new claim for depression and alcoholism secondary to ptsd??

Thanks

It's a funny thing but I am also interested in this. I came back in 1968, and by 1972 the VA admitted me into the hospital drunk ward and they kept me locked up in there for 90-days. I drank, as we all did, to forget and also to put up with the bashers. But, as we all know, they had not yet invented PTSD.

So comes 2005 and I finally get to file for PTSD, and I get 50% right up front on my first shot at it. But the physocologist at VA will NOT allow me to attend the PTSD treatment sessionsion because he says I drink too much. Yes, I still drink a lot but I still hold down a full time job.

According to my research, the Alcohol is a direct result of PTSD, even if it was diagnosed prior to the time that the PTSD was diagnosed. So what do you do, and how do you do it. Any suggestions, and has anyone else gone through this.

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Am I understanding your post right?

You get TDIU and also have a full time job?

Depression can be found as secondary to PTSD with medical evidence.

A disability due to alcoholism that is found secondary to a SC condition can be service connected-

The VBM gives this example- vet has PTSD and secondary SC alcoholism (determined by medical evidence)and develops cirrhosis of the liver.

The cirrhosis disability can be compensated.

The VBM 2005 also makes two other points- there was pending legislation before the House to attempt to overrule Allen V. Principi

-the CAVC decision that awarded SC for disability due to SC alcoholism.

Also they say that the VA usually never says the alcoholism is "secondary" but would "characterize the award as "PTSD with alcoholism".

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Bert it wasn't Calton saying he had TDIU, he had quoted the original post in his answer.

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I've heard you can service connect alcoholism, but it's no slam dunk by any means. The depression thing is basically pointless, as it is assumed that depression is already a side effect of PTSD. Also, there really isn't any circumstance (I can think of) that would cause you to not to get DiC if you happened to die from "depression"...the drugs that regulate depression are the same as PTSD and suicide would also be covered under PTSD. Basically, reopening your claim for depression would have no benefit and you could, potentially, have your rating lowered (not worth it IMO).

The alcohol thing may be worth it (your call), as there could be liver issues down the road that could cause your family to lose DiC. But, if family isn't an issue (no spouse, kids, etc), it really wouldn't benefit you to reopen a P&T 100% claim.

GL

Edited by Jay Johnson
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I have another question...or two:

Can you have major depressive disorder and alcoholism without having PTSD? I have done research on PTSD and have discovered I have a lot of the syptoms of PTSD. How can that be? VA says that I didn't have any experiences that could possibly trigger PTSD. Instead they focus on my drinking entirely.

Sorry, but I do get frustrated with VA sometimes.

Liz

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I have another question...or two:

Can you have major depressive disorder and alcoholism without having PTSD? I have done research on PTSD and have discovered I have a lot of the syptoms of PTSD. How can that be? VA says that I didn't have any experiences that could possibly trigger PTSD. Instead they focus on my drinking entirely.

Sorry, but I do get frustrated with VA sometimes.

Liz

There is a whole list of psychiatric disorders which are seperately rateable from PTSD...the trick is getting them service connected. The same goes for alcoholism....both are easier to connect with a PTSD like stressor, but not impossible to do without. I guess examples could be physical injuries which cause major depression that lead to alcoholism. I believe this is somewhat common among physcially disabled veterans, but you'll need solid evidence showing that there are no other stressors that are not the result of your injuries (IE - if a spouse/child dies and it cause you to depressed and drink then you're going to have a real hard time getting SC, but if a spouse leaves you because of a physical disability, or the problems therein, and this leads to depression, then you have a solid case for SC).

Either way, it's almost always in your best interest to pursue a claim... the worst they can say is no (well P&T cases have other things to weigh against potential claims).

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