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Thought Dbq's Were Supposed To Eliminate Need For C&p Exams


hedgey

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Hi everyone. Haven't been here in so long. Haven't been online in a long time - just not up to much of anything these days. Funny how you think you'll be okay and start living "someday" but then you look up and "someday" was two years ago...

So about the DBQ's. I thought if we got doctors to fill them out and submitted them, we'd be doing the VA a huge favor and saving them the cost of providing C&P exams.

At least that was what my VSO thought and when I filed my claim for an increase to my rating for my feet, and to SC my irritable bowel as secondary to PTSD, I had my doctors fill out DBQ's. They faxed copies to the VARO and also gave me copies for my files.

Yesterday I got a call from the VAMC (72 miles away) telling me that I have a two-hour C&P scheduled for next week. I'm very grateful that I was near the phone and picked it up.

I'm a nervous wreck about it already. I'm not good at going to the big hospital (panic attack land for me) and well....

Writing this has helped. I know I'm very lucky to have been scheduled, and even luckier that I happened to answer the phone so that I know about it. Also, I will have copies of the DBQ's in my hand to give the examiner. That's a good thing, right?

Thanks, Hadit, for being my sounding board!

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I would definitely take your DBQs and any other documentation you have supporting your contentions. During my last C & P, the NP conducting the C & P exam used info from my records to answer the C & P questions on her computer.

Good luck to you.

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Dbq can't keep up with rules and regulation changes. I've found most always miss something. For instance. Mitchell criteria.

- Mitchell v. Shinseki, 25 Vet. App. 32 (2011) reinforced that painful motion is the equivalent of limited motion only based on the specific language and structure of DC 5003, not for the purpose of DC 5260 and 5261. For arthritis, if one motion is actually compensable under its 52XX-series DC, then a 10 percent rating under DC 5003 is not available and the complementary motion cannot be treated as limited at the point where it is painful.

Most of the time the dbqs for the joints are the most incorrectly filled out. Jmho

Another example is a lot if times on cardio. The drs don't put the METS levels or check congestive heart failure.

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Hi everyone. Haven't been here in so long. Haven't been online in a long time - just not up to much of anything these days. Funny how you think you'll be okay and start living "someday" but then you look up and "someday" was two years ago...

So about the DBQ's. I thought if we got doctors to fill them out and submitted them, we'd be doing the VA a huge favor and saving them the cost of providing C&P exams.

At least that was what my VSO thought and when I filed my claim for an increase to my rating for my feet, and to SC my irritable bowel as secondary to PTSD, I had my doctors fill out DBQ's. They faxed copies to the VARO and also gave me copies for my files.

Yesterday I got a call from the VAMC (72 miles away) telling me that I have a two-hour C&P scheduled for next week. I'm very grateful that I was near the phone and picked it up.

I'm a nervous wreck about it already. I'm not good at going to the big hospital (panic attack land for me) and well....

Writing this has helped. I know I'm very lucky to have been scheduled, and even luckier that I happened to answer the phone so that I know about it. Also, I will have copies of the DBQ's in my hand to give the examiner. That's a good thing, right?

Thanks, Hadit, for being my sounding board!

Welcome back.

If the DBQ's have positive evidence in your favor - personally,

by all means, I would take copies of them to leave with the examiner/s.

jmho

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