Jump to content
VA Disability Community via Hadit.com

 Click To Ask Your VA Claims Question 

 Click To Read Current Posts  

  Read Disability Claims Articles 
View All Forums | Chats and Other Events | Donate | Blogs | New Users |  Search  | Rules 

  • homepage-banner-2024-2.png

  • donate-be-a-hero.png

  • 0

Stipend only?

Rate this question


MarineLCpl

Question

Hey all,

I might soon be facing a particular situation that I'm unsure how to handle. I am currently rated at 80% for a knee condition and PTSD. However, I am getting paid at the 100% IU rate. I went through Voc. Rehab, finished college, and now I am looking for work. A bit nervous about the whole thing, I have considered taking on a year-long volunteer position so I can slowly adjust to a normal workplace environment. This job will not be as demanding as one in my field, meaning there won't be as much pressure. I would be dedicating around 35 hours a week, roughly. I feel that if I dive head first into my field of study, things might get overwhelming pretty quick, causing a breakdown, or even worse. I want responsibilities, but I think I need to approach things carefully, or risk worsening my condition/situation. 

This volunteer position pays a stipend for living expenses, and that's it. The amount is around $12,500, I believe (before taxes). How will this affect my IU claim? This amount seems to be right on the borderline of being considered "too much" to be on IU. The federal poverty wage is a little less than 12k. So, I'm at a loss on how I should approach this. Would this position be considered substantially gainful employment? Should I report anything if I do get the job? Where do I stand?  

 

Any help would be appreciated, as per usual.

 

Semper Fi,

MarineLCpl

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recommended Posts

  • 0

The crazy one here, within the last six months I posted a post and a veteran thought I was challenging them and I was not. IMHO (In My Humble Opinion) due to your PTSD mental health disorder you should not think about going back to the work force. My opinion is based on several veteran I helped with getting 100% PTSD and then they wanted to go back to work and the problem is that they (the veterans) were able to keep their jobs for six months to a year and then they felt that it was better to not work at all. Once a veteran get his/her rating at 100% scheduler or TDIU it is best to continue to draw that rating and file for SSDI because if they give up that rating and go back to work and work for six months or more, VA will consider them employable and it will be very hard to try to go back to un-employability.  Yes, I know you would love to go back to work but the risk of losing benefits is not really worth it.  It is your call but you should consider yourself as disabled retiredI am just trying to help and this is my opinion  but you have to do what you feel is right for you and your family.

Hope the best

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
  • HadIt.com Elder

pete992

I'm not sure but  for some veterans that was injured in the military and is receipt of 100% compensation or TDIU   have a hard time making it with this compensation  especially if there well educated and have had good paying jobs that pay in access of 100.000 grand a year.

if there able to go back to work   I would not blame them  a lot of jobs that are high paying jobs are done from an office chair & computer.

What we get in 100% compensation barley make ends meet now days.

I wish I was able to go back to work but that's not the case for me....and thousands of other vets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Buck, I understand that some veterans had or can get very good jobs.  One of the veterans I was helping had a government job that paid somewhere between forty to fifty thousand a year but the problem was she had her job about thirteen months and she gave up her TDIU rating and her SSDI to get the job.  Because she worked over a year she was found to be employable then a month after that she had an episode that caused her to lose her job.  In my post I did say that it was my opinion and that the poster had to do what was right for them and their family.  I wanted the poster to know that it is really not about getting a job but keeping the job.  With PTSD or any mental health disorder a trigger can come from anywhere at any time. Veterans should really think long and hard before taking this step. When veterans give up their benefits and try to get them back they have to start all over again with VA and or SSA to get their benefits and that may not be an easy task.  I was/am just passing information on.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I am still somewhat young and hope to overcome my disabilities over time. I can't imagine not working for the rest of my life, and want nothing more than to be a productive member of society. I feel a bit ashamed when I'm not working at all, and feel like I am letting my parents down. In regards to this volunteer position, I would sort of use it as a trial for how I will respond to the workplace environment. The pressure is low, and the demands are not overwhelming. This is VERY different from actual employable positions within my field.


I'm not sure how technicalities work with IU, but for this calendar year, the earnings would be well below the poverty line (I'd guess around 5k or less earned). Next year, it would be around 7k earned). Pete, you mentioned something about that vets benefits being taken away after a year of employment. Well, this position would end just shy of a year, leaving me able to figure out which direction I want to go after a self-evaluation of my performance during my time. While I would like to think that I'd be able to handle this work with minimal issues, you are right when saying that triggers can appear out of nowhere, putting me in a bad spot. Honestly, I would like to take the chance at the hope of being able to function normally within society, not only to feel better about myself, but to show gratitude for all the help I've received along the way.


I have read some things about this report form that IU recipients are supposed to fill out every year. Not once have I received such a form, and have now just learned about it. Albeit, I have not been working the entire time I’ve been receiving IU, but still. If I were to take this position, I would start filling on of these out just to cover my butt. I have never tried to cheat the system, and have respected every aspect of the rules and regulations that accompany these awards. Using the figures I mentioned above, my yearly income for both this year and next would fall below the poverty line, making my continued eligibility valid, correct? I suppose every situation is different, but I’m just trying to wrap my head around the schematics before making such a big decision.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I could see a possibility of a husband and wife as partners running a small business.  The 1099 or W2/wages to the disabled vet husband/wife would be limited to less than the federal poverty level.  The partner spouse can make all the money he/she wants without affecting the Disabled Vet., so put the spouse as CEO and they can take in 50-100k per year. As long as the work is mostly sedentary, and you can take off any time you like, it should fly.  Stacking cinder blocks would probably be a bit unbelievable for something like this to work out.

This isn't legal advice, just my opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Guidelines and Terms of Use