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  • 14 Questions about VA Disability Compensation Benefits Claims

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    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
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  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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LizR

Military Dr. states medically retired but I am not.

Question

 I am not sure what to do about this or if I should do anything. I was discharged for panic disorder in 1985.

I received severance pay and told to go to the VA. I never met an AF medical Board nor had an  AF. Medical Exam. I was at admitted 

William Beaumont Army Hospital in TX. That was the closest hospital to deal with my panic attacks. Plus the 5 different drugs that the AF had me on that I needed detoxed to make me able to function. I went through terrible withdrawal and had a stroke or Bells Palsy. No mention in my medical records. The Army doctor was scared he did wrong not slowly getting me off the prescribed medications. Abruptly did me damage. 

Anyway...no help found for me so the army medical board said I need to be discharged. I went back to Davis Monthan for discharge. Had no physical. Just stayed home 3 weeks til my discharge. I received 20k severance and told to go to the VA.

I did go to the VA and spent 5 months there. Applied for VA benefits at Palo Alto VA in CA. through the DAV.(1985 and part of 1986)

Discharged from hospital Feb of 1986. Moved to New Mexico. Sought out VA Rep. to continue claim. Moved in 1986(Nov. to Rochester New York.).  Was so messed up on prescribed  medications did not ask for records to be sent from New Mexico. I was house bound but worked through it with help from VA.  Do not know how I was found but received letter I was granted 70% s/c and got a little back pay.

To make a long story short. My Rochester New York  VA doctor did not want me working although I did last 3 years at the Post Office and 6 years as a veteran Rep. for the Dept. of Labor. He said I worked when I shouldn't and others do not want to work when they should. He demanded I stop to care for myself. I did and received P/T IU at the 80 percent rate. (Since 1998).

I recently received records from St. Louis that I requested . I have at least 6 other s/c issues that I never filed a claim for. Anyway I do not want to rock the boat but wanted to have the documentation just in case IU is taken away at this late date. I am almost at 20 years.

In this batch of paper work  from St. Louis I see that my Air force doctor in 1985 said he recommended TDRL and that I WAS MEDICALY RETIRED.  I never knew that. Could that be true and I was severanced instead by mistake? I had a total of 13 years with prior service. Should I be concerned at this point as I receive 100% compensation benefits through the VA.?   

Any input appreciated. Not sure if I am in the correct forum for this topic. Thank you.

Elizabeth

USAF-IDMT

IU P/T

 

 

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Wow - I don't know the answer but that is an interesting story. Check this article you may find it helpful

6 Reasons to Keep Pursuing VA Claims and Appeals – AFTER you reach 100%

 BY  (EDIT)

 Today, I want to talk to you about a question that a lot of Veterans ask me: If I get a 100% rating, should I continue fighting the VA for benefits? Let’s jump right into the answer. Many Veterans perceive the 100% rating as the end of the … [Read more...]

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First, its unclear what your goal is:  

Are you interested in working, or are you interested in an increase in your disability rating?  

Hopefully you know "where you are now".  

Then, after you define "where you WANT to be".  

Then, formulate a plan to get there.  

If you are seeking an increase disability rating, then you need to go back to the basics:  If you are seeking TDIU, then you will need a doctors statement that you are unable to maintain substantial gainful employment DUE TO SC Conditions.   If you already have that documented in your records, then you should apply.  If its not documented, then you would need a voc rehab counselor/and/or a doctor statment of the same, perhaps from an IMO/IME.  

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I am not seeking to increase my disability. I was just wondering if there is a possibility that my discharge from the military was wrong. I received severance pay and now I see where my military doctor  before actual discharge stated I was medically retired. I was not medically retired. I was discharged with  severance which the VA recouped.. I went through all the claims process like most of us here when I got out of the military. I had no further benefits from the Air Force. Everything was a VA issue. * I was questioning if it is reasonable or not to question the VA or military about my discharge status.*   It was such a mixed up situation just before my discharge. I was not even at my home base and when I got there I was "out on the street" in a short time. I was just wondering if what the  Air Force doctor wrote in medical records at Davis Monthan  Az. about being medically retired was possibly correct  because he was in contact with the  Army doctors that I saw at William Beaumont in Tx( who said I need to be discharged and I met a medical board there.). Possibly info did not get to personnel at Davis Monthan  Az.  in time to have a correct  status on my discharge papers?,  Is it  to my benefit or not to question my military discharge status.? 

I am home a lot and this is anxiety and other issues  working in my head.  I do not mean to take up others time unnecessarily. Honestly  really sorry .

I am 100 percent compensated due to IU but at 80% s/c. through the VA.  Permanent and Total. since 1998.  This was gradual over 13 years of filing up to 1998. I am now 19 years out from my IU P/T Decision.  I have not worked nor can I work. I have enough everyday just taking care of me as a job. My husband is kind and supportive. I see a psychiatrist and other doctors regularly for S/C issues  and am getting into another VA group  next week. 

Edited by LizR

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I humbly suggest you "pick your battles" with VA.  Unless you have a compelling reason, I would not concern myself what a doctor said 19 years ago, as that does not seem to have any effects on your benefits, or your life.  Of course, I am unfamiliar with your life, so do persue this if there is a clear benefit to you.  

I suggest you work on issues that would result in some benefit to you as personally, I would not invest time unless there is a clear benefit.  Of course, if it meant something like dependent education for your children, now that may be worth fighting for.  

Instead of utilizing your time on somthing that may not change your benefits 1 cent, then I would recommend investing your time in something that will benefit you.  Of course, not necessarily money.  Some examples:

1.  Spend your time improving your marriage relationship (not to say that its bad) by "thinking up" nice things you could do for your husband.  If he loves angel food cake, make him one.  If he likes fresh vegetables, plant a garden.  You get the idea.  

2.  Same thing with your kids.  Write em a letter and tell them how much you love them, then tell them something they did to make you proud of them.  

3.  If you dont have kids, then do this for a friend. 

4.  Become a Veterans advocate and help other Veterans.  

5.  Read, and improve your knowledge of a subject you are interested in.  

6.  Get a hobby, such as knitting, fishing, that you can share with family and friends.  

7.  Love deeper.  

8.  Write a book if you have the inclination or skills.  

9.  Go find someone who needs help and help them.  By helping others be happy, you cant help from being happier yourself.  Do something small, you dont have to fix the whole world, just tell someone they did a great job (when they did).  

10.  Volunteer, if you have extra time.  Its been proven that makey YOU healthier.  

11.  Exercise to be fit to feel better.  

12.  If you can not do anything else, practice smiling.  

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 "Is it  to my benefit or not to question my military discharge status.? "

It is absolutely to your benefit to question the type of discharge you got.

Please read this info..

https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crdp.html

Also there is more discussion here on CRSC and CRDP

"Concurrent Retirement and Disability Pay (CRDP)

Concurrent Retirement and Disability Pay (CRDP) allows military retirees to receive both military retired pay and Veterans Affairs (VA) compensation. This was prohibited until the CRDP program began on January 1, 2004.

CRDP is a "phase in" of benefits that gradually restores a retiree's VA disability offset. This means that an eligible retiree's retired pay will gradually increase each year until the phase in is complete effective January 2014.

You do not need to apply for CRDP. If qualified, you will be enrolled automatically.

Eligibility
You must be eligible for retired pay to qualify for CRDP. If you were placed on a disability retirement, but would be eligible for military retired pay in the absence of the disability, you may be entitled to receive CRDP.

Under these rules, you may be entitled to CRDP if…

  • you are a regular retiree with a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater. 
     
  • you are a reserve retiree with 20 qualifying years of service, who has a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater and who has reached retirement age. (In most cases the retirement age for reservists is 60, but certain reserve retirees may be eligible before they turn 60. If you are a member of the Ready Reserve, your retirement age can be reduced below age 60 by three months for each 90 days of active service you have performed during a fiscal year.) 
     
  • you are retired under Temporary Early Retirement Act (TERA) and have a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater. 
     
  • you are a disability retiree who earned entitlement to retired pay under any provision of law other than solely by disability, and you have a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater. You might become eligible for CRDP at the time you would have become eligible for retired pay.

In addition to monthly CRDP payments, you may be eligible for a retroactive payment.  DFAS will audit your account to determine whether or not you are due retroactive payment. An audit of your account requires researching pay information from both DFAS and VA. 

If you are due any money from DFAS, you will receive it within 30-60 days of receipt of your first CRDP monthly payment. If DFAS finds that you are also due a retroactive payment from the VA, we will forward an audit to the VA. They are responsible for paying any money they may owe you.

Your retroactive payment date may go as far back as January 1, 2004, but can be limited based on:

  • your retirement date or
  • when you first increased to at least 50 percent disability rating

No CRDP is payable for any month before January 2004.

Individual Unemployability
You are eligible for full concurrent receipt of both your VA disability compensation and your retired pay, if you are a military retiree who meets all of the above eligibility requirements in addition to both of the following:

  • you are rated by the VA as unemployable, generally referred to as Individual Unemployability (IU)
  • you are in receipt of VA disability compensation as a result of IU

This is effective October 1, 2008 and is retroactive to January 1, 2005.

If you have any questions regarding your CRDP payment from DFAS, call 800-321-1080. For questions concerning disability ratings or disability compensation, please contact the VA at 800-827-1000"

https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crdp.html

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