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Berta

More Lawyers Beginning To

Question

email from Colonel Dan Cedusky:

http://www.news-record.com/apps/pbcs.dll/a...2/NRSTAFF/81438

8311.

contact: attorney firm at http://www.wcsr.com/ contact:

Veterans@wcsr.com

Need a veteran's attorney In Michigan.. contact: rpwalsh@sbcglobal.net

----------------------------------------------------------

----

Article published Jan 22, 2008

Vets get free legal advice for filing claims

A local law firm hopes to continue pairing attorneys with veterans during

workshops.

By Jennifer Fernandez

Staff Writer

WINSTON-SALEM - James Gaither says he spent four years in the Air Force in

Vietnam, running covert missions out of nearby countries.

Forty years later, he says he's struggling with the effects of Agent Orange.

The chemical was used to clear brush that enemy forces used for cover. It

has been blamed for various medical issues in Vietnam veterans.

Gaither, 62, was among about 40 veterans, some from as far away as Virginia,

who sought help last week with filing disability claims at Winston-Salem's

Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice. The law firm, in collaboration with the

Young Lawyers Division of the N.C. Bar Association, provided free legal

advice as part of its new "When Duty Calls" program. Clinics were first held

last year in Raleigh and Washington.

Veterans each spent about an hour with an attorney and legal assistants,

said Tim McClain, an attorney with Womble Carlyle and former general counsel

for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

"More of these clinics need to happen," he said. "Because there is a real

need there to assist veterans."

Veterans Affairs will receive more than 800,000 claims this year, McClain

said.

According to the agency, 2.8 million veterans were receiving disability

compensation as of September 2007.

In 2006, Veterans Affairs spent more than $2.3 billion in North Carolina to

care for more than 756,000 veterans here.

That same year, 138,379 N.C. veterans and survivors received disability

benefits, pension payments or some type of compensation, the agency

reported.

Veterans can file claims on their own, but it is a complicated process,

McClain said.

Gaither said he recently has been denied a pension and has been trying for

seven or eight years to increase his disability payments. He said he needs

the help because he is now on several medications, which he blames on his

exposure to Agent Orange.

Womble welcomed him and everyone was very nice, Gaither said.

About 30 of Womble's employees volunteered their time for the workshop.

Help also came from about 25 local law students and 10 attorneys from other

area firms.

"I got the feeling that they're really going to help me," Gaither said.

The law firm plans to offer workshops in Atlanta and Charlotte later this

year. And other law firms are replicating the program in their areas, said

Tripp Greason, director of the firm's free legal programs.

"We're trying to expand this," McClain said. "We'd love for this sort of

thing to go nationwide."

Greason hopes the law firm will build the reputation and expertise so that

veterans know to "just come to us."

Law Office contacts:

Atlanta

Galvin Devore (404) 872-7000

Baltimore

Dede Fowler (410) 545-5800

Charlotte

Charlie Allison (704) 331-4946

Greensboro

Melissa Weaver (336) 574-8033

Greenville

Barbara Fountain (864) 239-5997

Raleigh

John Turlington (919) 755-2117

Research Triangle Park

Mia Pizzagalli (919) 484-2302

Tysons Corner

Cheri Edwards (703) 790-4688

Washington, DC

Deborah Kowal (202) 857-4414

Wilmington

Marie Swyka (302) 252-4350

Winston-Salem

Keith Tedrow (336) 721-3594"

(PS Bob walsh ,veteran's attorney from Michigan ,is presently teaching veteran's advocates at Detroit Law School-his email is at top of this.

and the archive of his show with me at SVR -Jan 16th-should be up at Stardust anyday now)

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Good Post thanks Berta

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I contacted a local university, which has a law program, to see if they could provide help to veterans. I asked them to please help veterans on interpreting legal terms. I knew that they could not provide representation on VA claims. They told me that they could not provide the help. I was disappointed because the university has a program that provides free help on immigration issues for undocumented immigrants. 68mustang

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I think when all the hubbub is over we vets will be back to representing ourselves in most cases except for the few that are easy pickings for lawyers to make a fast buck. The ones I have talked to so far are either skeptical or unhelpful. It seems if it is not a slam/dunk they don't want it.

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email from Colonel Dan Cedusky:

http://www.news-record.com/apps/pbcs.dll/a...2/NRSTAFF/81438

8311.

contact: attorney firm at http://www.wcsr.com/ contact:

Veterans@wcsr.com

Need a veteran's attorney In Michigan.. contact: rpwalsh@sbcglobal.net

----------------------------------------------------------

----

Article published Jan 22, 2008

Vets get free legal advice for filing claims

A local law firm hopes to continue pairing attorneys with veterans during

workshops.

By Jennifer Fernandez

Staff Writer

WINSTON-SALEM - James Gaither says he spent four years in the Air Force in

Vietnam, running covert missions out of nearby countries.

Forty years later, he says he's struggling with the effects of Agent Orange.

The chemical was used to clear brush that enemy forces used for cover. It

has been blamed for various medical issues in Vietnam veterans.

Gaither, 62, was among about 40 veterans, some from as far away as Virginia,

who sought help last week with filing disability claims at Winston-Salem's

Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice. The law firm, in collaboration with the

Young Lawyers Division of the N.C. Bar Association, provided free legal

advice as part of its new "When Duty Calls" program. Clinics were first held

last year in Raleigh and Washington.

Veterans each spent about an hour with an attorney and legal assistants,

said Tim McClain, an attorney with Womble Carlyle and former general counsel

for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

"More of these clinics need to happen," he said. "Because there is a real

need there to assist veterans."

Veterans Affairs will receive more than 800,000 claims this year, McClain

said.

According to the agency, 2.8 million veterans were receiving disability

compensation as of September 2007.

In 2006, Veterans Affairs spent more than $2.3 billion in North Carolina to

care for more than 756,000 veterans here.

That same year, 138,379 N.C. veterans and survivors received disability

benefits, pension payments or some type of compensation, the agency

reported.

Veterans can file claims on their own, but it is a complicated process,

McClain said.

Gaither said he recently has been denied a pension and has been trying for

seven or eight years to increase his disability payments. He said he needs

the help because he is now on several medications, which he blames on his

exposure to Agent Orange.

Womble welcomed him and everyone was very nice, Gaither said.

About 30 of Womble's employees volunteered their time for the workshop.

Help also came from about 25 local law students and 10 attorneys from other

area firms.

"I got the feeling that they're really going to help me," Gaither said.

The law firm plans to offer workshops in Atlanta and Charlotte later this

year. And other law firms are replicating the program in their areas, said

Tripp Greason, director of the firm's free legal programs.

"We're trying to expand this," McClain said. "We'd love for this sort of

thing to go nationwide."

Greason hopes the law firm will build the reputation and expertise so that

veterans know to "just come to us."

Law Office contacts:

Atlanta

Galvin Devore (404) 872-7000

Baltimore

Dede Fowler (410) 545-5800

Charlotte

Charlie Allison (704) 331-4946

Greensboro

Melissa Weaver (336) 574-8033

Greenville

Barbara Fountain (864) 239-5997

Raleigh

John Turlington (919) 755-2117

Research Triangle Park

Mia Pizzagalli (919) 484-2302

Tysons Corner

Cheri Edwards (703) 790-4688

Washington, DC

Deborah Kowal (202) 857-4414

Wilmington

Marie Swyka (302) 252-4350

Winston-Salem

Keith Tedrow (336) 721-3594"

(PS Bob walsh ,veteran's attorney from Michigan ,is presently teaching veteran's advocates at Detroit Law School-his email is at top of this.

and the archive of his show with me at SVR -Jan 16th-should be up at Stardust anyday now)

Thanks Berta, this is great info.

I have a Vietnam buddy in NH, when we drive up to see him we drive across NY, upper part of NY is beautiful country, I was pleasantly surprised.

wapiti

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      It can be a bit daunting. Just remember the U.S.C. is the law, the C.F.R. is how they interpret the law and last but certainly not least is the V.A. adjudication manuals that is how they apply the law. The section of the law that covers the veterans benefits is Title 38 in the U.S.C. in the C.F.R. is usually written 38 C.F.R. or something similar.

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      We have a full Agent Orange forum here.

      Many veterans (and even their survivors) have succeeded in getting a disability, not on the presumptive list, service connected due to their proven exposure to AO.

      Also Secretary Wilkie is considering a few new presumptives, but we have no idea if  he will even add any to the list.

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      Most veterans with HBP were deemed as having "essential" - a medical term for no know cause- now we have a cause in Vietnam veterans---AO caused it.

       

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      https://www.nap.edu/read/25137/chapter/2

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