Jump to content


vlb-all-products.jpg

Get Every E-Book and Video with Member Discount Code HADIT2016







Popular Forums Common VA Disabilities


  • 0
david walker

Hysterectomy

Question

I have a friend who is on active duty, she will soon ETS. She had a hysterectomy immediately after the delivery of her second child (5 years ago). She planning on filing for SC. Can she do this, she's fine. I find it hard to believe she can get 50% for this and someone with real suffering can't get but 20%. I'm just a litte Peeved.

7617 Uterus and both ovaries, removal of, complete:

For three months after removal............................. \1\ 100

Thereafter................................................. \1\ 50

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

19 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

Guest Berta   
Guest Berta

"with real suffering" - I consider this to be a traumatic event for many women- physically and mentally-

if the VA will SC it- she should file the claim for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wings    17
I have a friend who is on active duty, she will soon ETS. She had a hysterectomy immediately after the delivery of her second child (5 years ago). She planning on filing for SC. Can she do this, she's fine. I find it hard to believe she can get 50% for this and someone with real suffering can't get but 20%. I'm just a litte Peeved.

7617 Uterus and both ovaries, removal of, complete:

For three months after removal............................. \1\ 100

Thereafter................................................. \1\ 50

This is your FRIEND, and you're "PEEVED"?! Dude, you're a guy - imagine if you will, the VA removes your testicles AND your testestorone is ZERO . . . how you gonna feel?! How do you know she's "fine"?! Are you her husband???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a friend who is on active duty, she will soon ETS. She had a hysterectomy immediately after the delivery of her second child (5 years ago). She planning on filing for SC. Can she do this, she's fine. I find it hard to believe she can get 50% for this and someone with real suffering can't get but 20%. I'm just a litte Peeved.

7617 Uterus and both ovaries, removal of, complete:

For three months after removal............................. \1\ 100

Thereafter................................................. \1\ 50

Believe me she wanted no more kids. And has told me she's glad she had it done. I'm not her husband but I am her friend. She just married the guy she left her husband for. This has in no way intrupted her sex life. Point is, its something she wanted, now she's gonna try and file for it. Can she do that. I would do anything I could for except help her get over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carlie    48

David,

It's been many, many years since doc's did hysterectomy's just for the hell of it.

I can pretty much promise you this procedure was not done as a means to no more children or just to halt her monthly cycle.

Your friend will most likely be advised to ingest possible cancer causing synthetic

hormones so she doesn't begin pre-mature menopause, as she probably will anyway. Here's some more info, good luck to your friend.

carlie

**************************************************************

Hysterectomy: Benefits and alternatives

No woman wants a hysterectomy she doesn't need. When is this surgery really necessary, and what are the alternatives?

Hysterectomy — the surgical removal of your uterus — can mean survival if you're diagnosed with uterine cancer. Or if you're a woman with severe pelvic pain and heavy, irregular periods, a hysterectomy often means relief from troublesome symptoms.

As one of the most common surgeries among women, hysterectomy is second only to Caesarean section. About one in three women in the United States has had a hysterectomy by the time she reaches age 60.

Learn more about this surgery, including when it's necessary, what's involved and what your alternatives might be.

Who is it for?

Hysterectomy may be needed if you have one of the following conditions:

Gynecologic cancer. If you have a gynecologic cancer — such as cancer of the uterus or cervix — a hysterectomy may be an effective treatment option for you. Depending on what kind of cancer you have and how advanced it is, your other options might include hormonal therapy or radiation treatments.

Fibroids. Hysterectomy is the only permanent solution for fibroids — benign uterine tumors that cause persistent bleeding, anemia, pelvic pain or bladder pressure. Fibroid tumors are common and may also be treated by nonsurgical means, depending on the size of your fibroids and the discomfort of your fibroid symptoms.

Endometriosis. If you have endometriosis, the tissue lining the inside of your uterus (endometrium) grows outside the uterus on your ovaries, fallopian tubes or other pelvic organs. This condition can cause pain or irregular bleeding. When medication or conservative surgery doesn't improve endometriosis, you might need a hysterectomy.

Uterine prolapse. Descent of the uterus into your vaginal canal can happen when the supporting ligaments and tissues weaken. Uterine prolapse can lead to urinary incontinence, pelvic pressure or difficulty with bowel movements. Hysterectomy may be necessary if other treatments — including medication or exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor — don't relieve this condition.

Persistent vaginal bleeding. If your periods are heavy and irregular, lasting increasingly longer each cycle, a hysterectomy may bring relief when the bleeding can't be controlled by other methods.

Chronic pelvic pain. Surgery may be necessary when evidence points to your uterus or ovaries as the source of your pain. However, many forms of pelvic pain aren't cured by hysterectomy. Seek careful evaluation before proceeding with such a radical strategy.

Hysterectomy ends your ability to become pregnant. If you think you might want to become pregnant at some future point, ask your doctor about alternatives to this surgery. In the case of cancer, hysterectomy might not be optional. But other conditions — including fibroids, endometriosis and uterine prolapse — offer alternative treatments that you can try first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SeattleShay    29

Let me tell you something FRIEND......

I'd like to cut off your testicles and see how you fair after that remark, since you'd still be able to have sex also.

I had a hysterectomy while on AD. I didn't want anymore children also, so I could have had a tubal, but because of medical complications was forced to have a hysterectomy.

I suffered horrible hormone imbalances..because let's face it no one in their right mind would take hormones and chance breast cancer on top of everything else.., I was suicidal because of the hormone imbalance, I have servere disc degeneration because I was 29 when I had the surgery, I have lost most of my lower jaw and all of my bottom teeth because of bone degeneration due to no hormones, my hair and skin look like hell unless I spend extra money to buy good products to use on them, I have high BP because of no hormones and heart problems that are specific to post menopausal women......

But what the HELL I CAN STILL HAVE SEX>>>SO I MUST NOT BE SUFFERING !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

if I had a penis and a prostate I'd be drawing a 100%..........'-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Jim S.   
Guest Jim S.

It always amazes me how some men jump at the chance to stick their foot in their mouth as if they like doing it. I'ver found that when a person has had a life altering event, they try to down play it by trying to make it look like it was something good or they wanted it in the first place.

I am the youngest of five children and I remember my mother saying that had she not had her uterus removed after I was born, she would be raising kids till my father retired and she wasn't to sure about that either. She always tried to make it sound humorous, but somehow, I think she wished she was able to have at least a couple of more kids.

Later in life, you could see the toll that balancing her hormones had on her, and how you could almost compare her with someone diagnosed as being bi-polar. Then taking care of her when she went through bladder cancer with radiation and chemo therepy, after having a softball size tumor removed from the wall of her bladder.

No, I don't care what your friend said to you, their will come a time, if it hasn't arleady come, that she will be wishing she would have had another choice.

It's kind of something like when you have forgotten their birthday or Valentines day, they will be hurt but they will tell you if didn't really matter. You know when they say it doesn't matter, your in the dog house for sure. So if you hear them say it doesn't matter or their glad about it, don't take it to mean that it is etched in stone. It usually isn't.

One wise person told me once. Listen to what women say and then take it to mean the oposite, when it comes to something as important as their body is conserned. More time than not, you will have a better understanding on what they are actully saying. If this is making any since, Then you are one step out of a million closer in understanding the female psychie.

Oh! Without knowing the time table of her surgery, when she left her husband or started having relations with her new bow, I cannot comment on the psychological ramification her surgery may have played on this part of her life.

As a man speeking about women, I apologize if I have offended any of the ladys here. To the men, i'm less inclined to care. Just take it as a word to the wise and a grain of salt if you want.

Jim S. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×