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Athlete's Feet And/or Tinea Pedis

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Sgt. Wilky

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Hello Everyone!

I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with being rated for Athlete's Feet and/or Tinea Pedis? I had a C & P exam today, and the examiner seemed a little "conflicted." She seemed to downplay the effects, while commenting on the 'extensive' nature of problem. I wondered out loud to her if I may have the wrong diagnosis. I am most curious if anyone is rated above 0%. I can't seem to find anywhere on the internet where the formula for figuring out the body percentages. Of course, I would like to be compensated, as the topical creams and the oral medication is not working, and makes me feel quite ill. I also have to change my socks in the middle of the day. Also, I have it on both feet, and I am rated at 10% each for two other conditions. I can't seem to figure out on the calculator how they would do that. Thank you for any input you al may have!!

Semper Fi,

Sgt. Wilki

BOHICA

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Yes, I've had it a time or three. The two things to think about are exposure, and what to do to get rid of it.

This seems to be a good place to at least look.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.....disease.causes

Bleach, Hydrogen Peroxide, are common chemicals to use in reducing exposure.

Shoes can re infect if not washed in a bleach solution, or some sort of anti-fungal is used to "disinfect" them.

The last go around I had was a son that repeatedly "brought it home" from a high school gym class/locker room.

common bathing area floors were scrubbed/washed with cleaning solutions containing bleach and a detergent.

His shoes were replaced or washed in a detergent bleach solution.

Socks were washed separately, and possibly pre-soaked in a bleach detergent solution.

Iodine containing solutions may be appropriate when washing feet.

My experience was that some of the OTC antifungals don't work, and others are really too strong, causing my skin to "weep".

One of the more reasonably effective and inexpensive OTC chemicals is no longer easily available in my area. Besides, it can stain your skin.

The below reference lists it, and actually spells the name correctly, something I have trouble remembering.

http://www.mayoclini...mation/DR600723

I used to get it in pill form from the pharmacy, and dissolve the pills in a bowl of warm water, then soak feet.

When I was in the shipboard Navy eons ago, the favored chemical for cleaning and killing foot fungus was a strong iodine solution used in common

areas, such as showers and heads. If you ever wondered why the flooring in these areas was usually a red colored terrazzo, you now know where the red came from.

If you have diabetes, or PAD, there is cause for some concern. In persistent cases, you should see a doctor.

I almost forgot, a washing machine, if not flushed with a bleach solution, and the rubber seals at the top of the tub wiped with bleach periodically, can harbor the fungus.

Hello Everyone!

I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with being rated for Athlete's Feet and/or Tinea Pedis? I had a C & P exam today, and the examiner seemed a little "conflicted." She seemed to downplay the effects, while commenting on the 'extensive' nature of problem. I wondered out loud to her if I may have the wrong diagnosis. I am most curious if anyone is rated above 0%. I can't seem to find anywhere on the internet where the formula for figuring out the body percentages. Of course, I would like to be compensated, as the topical creams and the oral medication is not working, and makes me feel quite ill. I also have to change my socks in the middle of the day. Also, I have it on both feet, and I am rated at 10% each for two other conditions. I can't seem to figure out on the calculator how they would do that. Thank you for any input you al may have!!

Semper Fi,

Sgt. Wilki

Edited by Chuck75
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Yes, I've had it a time or three. The two things to think about are exposure, and what to do to get rid of it.

This seems to be a good place to at least look.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.....disease.causes

Bleach, Hydrogen Peroxide, are common chemicals to use in reducing exposure.

Shoes can re infect if not washed in a bleach solution, or some sort of anti-fungal is used to "disinfect" them.

The last go around I had was a son that repeatedly "brought it home" from a high school gym class/locker room.

common bathing area floors were scrubbed/washed with cleaning solutions containing bleach and a detergent.

His shoes were replaced or washed in a detergent bleach solution.

Socks were washed separately, and possibly pre-soaked in a bleach detergent solution.

Iodine containing solutions may be appropriate when washing feet.

My experience was that some of the OTC antifungals don't work, and others are really too strong, causing my skin to "weep".

One of the more reasonably effective and inexpensive OTC chemicals is no longer easily available in my area. Besides, it can stain your skin.

The below reference lists it, and actually spells the name correctly, something I have trouble remembering.

http://www.mayoclini...mation/DR600723

I used to get it in pill form from the pharmacy, and dissolve the pills in a bowl of warm water, then soak feet.

When I was in the shipboard Navy eons ago, the favored chemical for cleaning and killing foot fungus was a strong iodine solution used in common

areas, such as showers and heads. If you ever wondered why the flooring in these areas was usually a red colored terrazzo, you know know where the red came from.

If you have diabetes, or PAD, there is cause for some concern. In persistent cases, you should see a doctor.

I almost forgot, a washing machine, if not flushed with a bleach solution, and the rubber seals at the top of the tub wiped with bleach periodically, can harbor the fungus.

I use to have it bad when I was younger.When I switched too 100% cotton socks it went away and I haven't had it for years.Give me cotton/nylon blend and 2 days later my feet are a bloody mess. It's the same way with my jungle rot, gotta be cotton or else.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

"jungle rot"

That troubled my father for years (WWII, New Guinea, etc) He'd get it in his ears, and spots on his chest in the hairy areas, every summer into the 1960's.

Eventually, he ran across a doctor that was familiar with that area and the problems. The cure was simple. Swab the ears with the appropriate Iodine solution. (Don't ask me what the strength was, I don't know.)

He used the same iodine pads or solution that are sometimes used for surgical prep. Wa-La, gone after two treatments!

As to cotton socks, they really help. The socks wick moisture away from the skin. The various synthetics don't. Color dye can be an irritant. Never wear colored socks without washing them once or twice.

I also prefer high cotton content shirts and underwear for the same reasons.

While I mentioned iodine, I've also gotta say that I have had problems when it's used over large skin areas prior to major surgery.

I use to have it bad when I was younger.When I switched too 100% cotton socks it went away and I haven't had it for years.Give me cotton/nylon blend and 2 days later my feet are a bloody mess. It's the same way with my jungle rot, gotta be cotton or else.

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Hello Everyone!

I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with being rated for Athlete's Feet and/or Tinea Pedis? I had a C & P exam today, and the examiner seemed a little "conflicted." She seemed to downplay the effects, while commenting on the 'extensive' nature of problem. I wondered out loud to her if I may have the wrong diagnosis. I am most curious if anyone is rated above 0%. I can't seem to find anywhere on the internet where the formula for figuring out the body percentages. Of course, I would like to be compensated, as the topical creams and the oral medication is not working, and makes me feel quite ill. I also have to change my socks in the middle of the day. Also, I have it on both feet, and I am rated at 10% each for two other conditions. I can't seem to figure out on the calculator how they would do that. Thank you for any input you al may have!!

Semper Fi,

Sgt. Wilki

You can estimate the body surface area by the Rule of 9's. The percentage of the body involved can be calculated as follows:

  • Head = 9%
  • chest (front) = 9%
  • abdomen (front) = 9%
  • Upper/mid/low back and buttocks = 18%
  • Each arm = 9% (front = 4.5%, back = 4.5%)
  • Groin = 1%
  • Each leg = 18% total (front = 9%, back = 9%)

Although the feet aren't shown, the body surface area of the entire front of a leg is 9%, so a foot is obviously less than half, or even a third of that. In addition, athlete's foot normally does not encompass the entire foot, therefore making the percentage even less.... Like 1-2%, which equates to a 0%. It would be nearly impossible to get a 10% evaluation off of the feet alone, as the percentage of total body, or exposed body is just too small.

7813 Dermatophytosis (ringworm: of body, tinea corporis; of head, tinea capitis; of feet, tinea pedis; of beard area, tinea barbae; of nails, tinea unguium; of inguinal area (jock itch), tinea cruris):

Rate as disfigurement of the head, face, or neck (DC 7800), scars (DC's 7801, 7802, 7803, 7804, or 7805), or dermatitis (DC 7806), depending upon the predominant disability.

Since you have a problem with your feet, we can rule out 7800 as a diagnostic code, as this is not the head, face or neck. You can be rated under scars (DC 7801,7802, 7803,7804,7805), or dermatitis (DC 7806). Most of the ratings that I have done were 0%, however, if you have dermatitis, eczema, or other skin issues that are service connected, on top of the athletes foot, the chances are, you will have a higher the percentage of exposed body or total body area affected, hence a 10%, or maybe even 20% disability evaluation. The creams that you said you were taking constitute topical therapy. However, you stated that you take medications as well, and without knowing the names of those medications, I am unable to determine whether they are systemic therapy such as corticosteroids, or other immunosupressive drugs. What are you, or have you been taking?

Edited by HM1retiredUSN
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My private dermatologist put me on Turbinafine, and I took the Rx, however, it barely made a dent in the condition. I haven't been back to her yet, but that's why I was wondering if it could be something else. The examiner said that I had the 'moccasin' effect on the entire bottom portion of both my feet, with hyper (or hypo) pigmentation, peeling, and once the feet dried, the bottoms and toes of my feet would turn white and patchy. They would crack and bleed and hurt to walk on. The itching drives me totally crazy. I have in the past developed blisters, but the Turbinafine to this point, I think has prevented that from coming back.

Thank you for your response!

Sgt. Wilki

You can estimate the body surface area by the Rule of 9's. The percentage of the body involved can be calculated as follows:

  • Head = 9%
  • chest (front) = 9%
  • abdomen (front) = 9%
  • Upper/mid/low back and buttocks = 18%
  • Each arm = 9% (front = 4.5%, back = 4.5%)
  • Groin = 1%
  • Each leg = 18% total (front = 9%, back = 9%)

Although the feet aren't shown, the body surface area of the entire front of a leg is 9%, so a foot is obviously less than half, or even a third of that. In addition, athlete's foot normally does not encompass the entire foot, therefore making the percentage even less.... Like 1-2%, which equates to a 0%. It would be nearly impossible to get a 10% evaluation off of the feet alone, as the percentage of total body, or exposed body is just too small.

7813 Dermatophytosis (ringworm: of body, tinea corporis; of head, tinea capitis; of feet, tinea pedis; of beard area, tinea barbae; of nails, tinea unguium; of inguinal area (jock itch), tinea cruris):

Rate as disfigurement of the head, face, or neck (DC 7800), scars (DC's 7801, 7802, 7803, 7804, or 7805), or dermatitis (DC 7806), depending upon the predominant disability.

Since you have a problem with your feet, we can rule out 7800 as a diagnostic code, as this is not the head, face or neck. You can be rated under scars (DC 7801,7802, 7803,7804,7805), or dermatitis (DC 7806). Most of the ratings that I have done were 0%, however, if you have dermatitis, eczema, or other skin issues that are service connected, on top of the athletes foot, the chances are, you will have a higher the percentage of exposed body or total body area affected, hence a 10%, or maybe even 20% disability evaluation. The creams that you said you were taking constitute topical therapy. However, you stated that you take medications as well, and without knowing the names of those medications, I am unable to determine whether they are systemic therapy such as corticosteroids, or other immunosupressive drugs. What are you, or have you been taking?

BOHICA

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