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Went For Tinnitus C & P


Cavman

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I went for the tinnitus c & p at the V.A. hospital. After I drove 50 miles and parked a mile away I got in there and was informed I was instructed to come there for my travel pay only. I was given $8.00 and sent a couple miles away to a civilian audiologist. I was asked a few questions by a young trainee. It was totally not right after I had planned on what to say the correct way and wasn`t able to talk about how I got tinnitus. I tried to mention mortars, artillery, rockets, b-52`s, machine gun fire, tank fire etc. She wrote down exposed to missles. Then I was put in the hearing booth and told I had decent hearing and a report would be sent to the V.A Goodbye.

Cavman

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Guest rickb54

Caveman,

This dosen't sound like it went in your favor. But you can never tell.

I had an examiner tell me once that my knee was so messed up I would get an increase, instead I was lucky to keep my 10%.

Hang in there... if it is not favorable... well you know the drill

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I was just turned down for bilateral tinitus. All they did was perform a hearing test and ask some questions. The tinitus is only mentioned in my SMR's twice during my final physical exams just before I got out. I had brought it up a couple times before that but they pretty much always told me nothing could be done and apparently left it out of my SMR's. I was a helicopter pilot exposed to the high whine of the engines daily. Also, the regular gun fire, grenade explosions and such 99% of all military are exposed to. I filed right after exiting service. Ill have to appeal and just hope for the best. Good luck on yours Cavman.

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I was just turned down for bilateral tinitus. All they did was perform a hearing test and ask some questions. The tinitus is only mentioned in my SMR's twice during my final physical exams just before I got out. I had brought it up a couple times before that but they pretty much always told me nothing could be done and apparently left it out of my SMR's. I was a helicopter pilot exposed to the high whine of the engines daily. Also, the regular gun fire, grenade explosions and such 99% of all military are exposed to. I filed right after exiting service. Ill have to appeal and just hope for the best. Good luck on yours Cavman.

Nathan;

It sounds to me like they deni hearing loss, and tinnitus often, John is at the rating board now, but the way the Dr. for C&P wrote down for hearing loss, tinnitus and Menier's I have written down an NOD for John. This is how I started it it may help you and others also. I did a lot of research before I started the Nod.

I served on active duty in the marie Crop june of 1966 to June of 1970 and re-elisted October of 1970. My enistment exam dated Feb. 19636 indicate normal hearing there where the other exam noted in my records.

During my active duty I was exposed to loud noise from helicopters, pistols rifles, and machine gun, rockete and mortar attacks. I was also engaged in combat with the enemy while in active service as a helicopter arieal gunner. My Mo was helecopter hydraulics. and I exposed to jet engines and gun fire continually while in active service. I served in Vietnam for 12 months. My miltary discharge certifcate state that I recieved the Vietnam service medal and combat action ribbon and naval combat air crew wings.

I contend that my current hearing loss is the result of these noises while in active service.

I content that I was not advised on my rights to file a claim for hearing loss or tinnitus

My service medical records show that when I entered active service in 1966, the audiological evaluation stated pure tone thershold ,the service medical records state that in 1968 I had a mild hearing loss in both ears.re-enlistment exam in 1970 indicate mild hearing loss in both ears and so did the final discharge exam in 1972.While I never complained of the ringing in my ears it has persisted. With that benig said, I was not treated for tinnitus while in service but the onset of my tinnitus was in service.and tinnitus may not reasonably be disassociated from the noise exposure in service.and the neurosensory componet of my service connected hearing loss. my tinnitus is proximately due to the service connect sensorineural hearing loss. When I was examined for the pupose of separtion from service in 1972 the diagnois included high frequency hearing loss

Section 38 U.S.C.A. 1110 State service connection may be granted for disability resulting from disease or injury incurred in or aggavated by wartime servic. and section 38 C.F.R. 3.303(d) for tinnitus is established.

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I was just turned down for bilateral tinitus. All they did was perform a hearing test and ask some questions. The tinitus is only mentioned in my SMR's twice during my final physical exams just before I got out. I had brought it up a couple times before that but they pretty much always told me nothing could be done and apparently left it out of my SMR's. I was a helicopter pilot exposed to the high whine of the engines daily. Also, the regular gun fire, grenade explosions and such 99% of all military are exposed to. I filed right after exiting service. Ill have to appeal and just hope for the best. Good luck on yours Cavman.

Nathan;

It sounds to me like they deni hearing loss, and tinnitus often, John is at the rating board now, but the way the Dr. for C&P wrote down for hearing loss, tinnitus and Menier's I have written down an NOD for John. This is how I started it it may help you and others also. I did a lot of research before I started the Nod.

I served on active duty in the marie Crop june of 1966 to June of 1970 and re-elisted October of 1970. My enistment exam dated Feb. 19636 indicate normal hearing there where the other exam noted in my records.

During my active duty I was exposed to loud noise from helicopters, pistols rifles, and machine gun, rockete and mortar attacks. I was also engaged in combat with the enemy while in active service as a helicopter arieal gunner. My Mo was helecopter hydraulics. and I exposed to jet engines and gun fire continually while in active service. I served in Vietnam for 12 months. My miltary discharge certifcate state that I recieved the Vietnam service medal and combat action ribbon and naval combat air crew wings.

I contend that my current hearing loss is the result of these noises while in active service.

I content that I was not advised on my rights to file a claim for hearing loss or tinnitus

My service medical records show that when I entered active service in 1966, the audiological evaluation stated pure tone thershold ,the service medical records state that in 1968 I had a mild hearing loss in both ears.re-enlistment exam in 1970 indicate mild hearing loss in both ears and so did the final discharge exam in 1972.While I never complained of the ringing in my ears it has persisted. With that benig said, I was not treated for tinnitus while in service but the onset of my tinnitus was in service.and tinnitus may not reasonably be disassociated from the noise exposure in service.and the neurosensory componet of my service connected hearing loss. my tinnitus is proximately due to the service connect sensorineural hearing loss. When I was examined for the pupose of separtion from service in 1972 the diagnois included high frequency hearing loss

Section 38 U.S.C.A. 1110 State service connection may be granted for disability resulting from disease or injury incurred in or aggavated by wartime servic. and section 38 C.F.R. 3.303(d) for tinnitus is established.

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Nathan-there is a Stay proceeding on "bilateral" tinnitus claims- did they mention that in the decision?

Even so -do you mean they didn't even rate one ear for tinnitus?

"The tinitus is only mentioned in my SMR's twice during my final physical exams just before I got out" This is evidence that is more than what I usually see in tinnitus claims-

it often is not in the SMRs at all.

Did they actually consider that evidence from your SMRs?

Edited by Berta (see edit history)
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Appeal the tinnitus denial. Even though we had evidence stated in the SMR's, my husband's claim was denied. That's when I copied and charted all the hearing test scores found in his records over the years, and submitted the appeal. They granted it from the date of the "new evidence" as they referred to his records. Now we've got a CUE in to the RO for the earlier effective date of claim for hearing loss, which was the first day of his retirement, since the information was in his SMR's all along.

I think tinnitus is one of those claims many RO's deny just to see if the veteran will come back at them with an appeal.

Edited by Vicki (see edit history)
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I don't understand having a problem getting tinnitus with the right MOS. I went for a hearing & tinnitus examination and as far as tinnitus the examiner just asked about service and non service noise exposure. Got a more likely than not.

Glenn

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What is the RIGHT MOS?

I`m taking it for granted that a combat mos would be necessary for a successful tinnitus claim. I`m relating that to the Army. I doubt a soldier with a cook, supply, clerical etc mos would have much of a chance of getting a tinnitus claim if they were not exposed to constant loud noise.

Cavman

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I don't understand having a problem getting tinnitus with the right MOS. I went for a hearing & tinnitus examination and as far as tinnitus the examiner just asked about service and non service noise exposure. Got a more likely than not.

Glenn

What was your mos? You must also be in a region where the VARO ids more lenient.

Cavman

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Tinnitus doesn't have to be caused by a constant loud noise. One significant occurrence, for instance, being near an explosion, can cause tinnitus.

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Nathan-there is a Stay proceeding on "bilateral" tinnitus claims- did they mention that in the decision?

Even so -do you mean they didn't even rate one ear for tinnitus?

"The tinitus is only mentioned in my SMR's twice during my final physical exams just before I got out" This is evidence that is more than what I usually see in tinnitus claims-

it often is not in the SMRs at all.

Did they actually consider that evidence from your SMRs?

Nothing about a stay proceeding. Although now looking through it, I see that it states

"there is no evidencewhich shows the condition to have been incurred in or aggravated by service, nor a link of current condition to your military service. A review of your service medical records provides no evidence of complaint, treatment or diagnosis for tinnitus in service. VA exam shows the examiner to provide medical opinion stating based on objective and subjective auidometric evaluation, it is not likely your tinnitus is consistent with the acoustic trauma experience in the military. "

This sounds like they did not notice the two pages from my final exit exam from the military where I wrote it on the physical exam questoinaire and where the doctor wrote it on a seperate page during the exam. Of course it also sounds like the audiologist who did the hearing test went against me as well. I wonder if I sent in the two pages noting it in service again would be enough.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Thanks for the inspiration, I have made some New years resolutions to get tinnitus connection. Just tonight reviewed my medical records, eyesight hurts trying to read medics handwriting, but just found one statement re "ear ringing" other places mention 2 concussion, seperate issues. Will attend to my tinnitus evlauation much more prepared now, that is taking military records alongto well recommended hearing clinic appointment. I also will take official job descriptions along to help define the work I did, hope thats not overdoing it. Good luck to you and us all. cg

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What was your mos? You must also be in a region where the VARO ids more lenient.

Cavman

My MOS was 11B in Vietnam. My SMR's had near perfect hearing on entry and bad on exit from the service.

Glenn

D/2/501 101st Abn Inf

Walked the woods 67-68

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