Jump to content
Using an Ad Blocker? Consider adding HadIt.com as an exception. Hadit.com is funded through advertising, ad free memberships, contributions and out of pocket. ×

Recommended Posts

We have a new VA psychiatrist at our rural OMH clinic. She's wonderful - she's new to the VA and hasn't yet lost her mind dealing with the administration.

She is frustrated with the pharmacy side of things. She told us (DH & I are both patients) that she doesn't like generics, especially from the lowest bidder. She said that by law, generics are allowed to vary from the patented formula by 20% in strength. This could mean the generic is 20% stronger or 20% weaker than the brand-name drug.

Does that sound right? I mean, I like her and feel like she knows her stuff, but can they really be that far off the formula?

It certainly would explain why sometimes it feels like the meds aren't working as well as the month before, etc.

It seems bizarre to play so fast & loose with MH meds. What if one month my anti-anxiety is stronger and the same month my anti-depressant is weaker... wouldn't that really put me on a slippery slope??

And why the Heck are they prescribing so much gabepentin to a person with MDD? Oops, that's another thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

We have a new VA psychiatrist at our rural OMH clinic. She's wonderful - she's new to the VA and hasn't yet lost her mind dealing with the administration.

She is frustrated with the pharmacy side of things. She told us (DH & I are both patients) that she doesn't like generics, especially from the lowest bidder. She said that by law, generics are allowed to vary from the patented formula by 20% in strength. This could mean the generic is 20% stronger or 20% weaker than the brand-name drug.

Does that sound right? I mean, I like her and feel like she knows her stuff, but can they really be that far off the formula?

The strengths of active ingredients must be consistant with the amounts the RX is written for.

JMHO

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Argh. Thanks Carlie. That's what I always thought.

I talked with DH about this topic last night and he suspects that the psychiatrist is just repeating bunk that she's heard from the pharma reps who come/came to her private office.

Sigh. I wasn't hoping she was right about the generics. I was just hoping she knew her peas from her carrots.

I'm glad that I brought it up here and got straightened out. Sigh, again. Another VA doc whose words much be liberally salted before consumption. :(

Edited by hedgey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

My experience with generics is ok. Although the VA dispenses under generic names many of my prescriptions are actually brand.. Example my cosar actually came in bottle with VA label calling it lorsartin. In the 90;s xanax was xanax,

If your med does not seem to be right generic or brand you should tell your Doc.

Good Luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I was placed on generic tegretol for two years after using the brand name for 25 years which controlled

my siezures I started having seizures again with the generics I told my neurologist and PCP about what was happening but nothing was done about my situation for over a year then I finally had my PCP write prescribtions for me to use outside the

VA pharmacy which cost me 160.00 a months this lasted for 3 months until this was taken care of I am now recieving the brand name pink tablets again seizure free and was never reimbused for the money I had to spend for tegretol. The generics might work for some people but not for everyone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

Hedgay

The VA prescribes that generic neurontin for pain control, PTSD and MDD. I think it is cheap and hard to OD on so they use it a lot. The drugs the VA really hates to prescribe are narcotics and drugs of the valium family.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Ads

  • Ads

  • Ads

  • Our picks

  • Ads

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ad

  • Latest News
  • veteranscrisisline-badge-chat-1.gif

  • Advertisemnt

  • 14 Questions about VA Disability Compensation Benefits Claims

    questions-001@3x.png

    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
    Continue Reading
     
  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • Advertisemnt

  • VA Watchdog

  • Advertisemnt

  • Ads

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines