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Mental Exam -- Ssdi Implications... And Impact On Existing Va Rating


Snake Eyes

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I had a mental exam for SSDI yesterday with the primary complaint being Generalized Anxiety Disorder and depression. The psychologist and I had a wide ranging conversation and I don't think she got in all the canned questions Social Security has on their forms.

As a result, she talked like she thought I was "over stressed" and had a "bruised ego from rejection" (jobs I lost or were downsized from) and so forth.

The SSDI claim has several medical conditions along with the GAD, and I have a physical exam next month.

What are the implications of Consultative Exams? Would they give more weight to the person who talks with you for an hour than say, a letter from Dr. Bash after he examined me and reviewed over 1,000 pages of my medical records? Dr. Bash's letter points out that I'm over 60 years old -- apparently because age is a factor Social Security considers when you come close but do not fully meet their disability guidelines for a given condition.

If she "diagnoses" stress and anger issues for Social Security, would that potentially cause a reversal of my GAD rating from the VA if I include SSDI as part of a TDIU claim?

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  • HadIt.com Elder

At age 55, SSDI is less stringent on the disability rules. You are wise to pursue SSDI, rather than waiting for retirement age, as you get the full rate now and can pickup Medicare in 2 yrs. I'm sure Dr. Bash has you covered!!! Good luck and never ever give up. Keep us posted.

pr

Edited by Philip Rogers
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Not so sure about the Dr. Bash angle. In his original letter, he had several factual errors, which I corrected. He also had me re-write some of his language to more accurately reflect my conditions.

For those who haven't used his services yet, this is NOT unusual. He sends his initial draft in Word format, and if you have Word you can make corrections, which he'll see in "review mode" in Word and approve (or make his own corrections).

However, getting information into his hands has been very difficult for me. He originally requested DBQs with my personal info and his signature blocks filled in, which he'd complete based on his notes from when he did the exam. I sent those by mail and I don't know if he ever got them, but he has requested items I hand-carried to our appoinment on a few occasions. He was not at his Mariland office over the summer; I suspect that accounts for a lot of the phone-email-postal mail-fax tag we've played over the summer.

Hopping it gets better.

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