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Ssd Hearing


ATVer

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Taking the advice from the people on this site and applying for SSD back in June 2010 for PTSD, got denied and i appealed. I now have a hearing at the end of February. Just wondering if anyone had any advice for me? I have most of my ecidence in, i will be getting a letter from my psychologist and psychiatrist before i go to the hearing, so that is more evidence i will have for my case. I also have a SSD lawyer that will be going along with me as well.

Right now i'm 40% SC, 0% hearing loss, 10% tinnitus, and 30% PTSD with the VA, but have an appeal in for that. I'm young, at 26 years old, and haven't worked since 07 due to my service connection, dealing with it day to day sucks. My psychologist told me to write down how i think PTSD affects my work, relationships, and daily life and he'd write me a letter, will the letter need a GAF score in it or does SSD use that? All my evidence is coming from my VA file that they have already, i just have a bit more to add with these letters. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!

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ATVer, The more evidence the better, Your lawyer will know what you need if he/she is good. I was denied a few times and then got a lawyer, when I walked in to the ADJ,

he opened my file, shook his head and told me not to worry, I have been on SSDI since 2001. I applied for my Service connected Heart Problems (CAD).

Good Luck, and Please let us know.

NJ

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40% from the VA is not going to carry much weight, if you don't have other non-service connected conditions. You need to get as much evidence and Residual Capacity Forms from your providers.

From reading many posts by veterans who have applied for SDDI, I think it is still pretty much dependent upon who you get as your Administrative Law Judge (ALJ). I wish you the best with your hearing.

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The real strike against you is your age. SSA seriously tries to avoid granting SSDI to someone of your age. It's not law, just administrative practice.

The more evidence in your favor, the better. SSA may call for an additional exam by a doctor they designate before it's all said and done.

Taking the advice from the people on this site and applying for SSD back in June 2010 for PTSD, got denied and i appealed. I now have a hearing at the end of February. Just wondering if anyone had any advice for me? I have most of my ecidence in, i will be getting a letter from my psychologist and psychiatrist before i go to the hearing, so that is more evidence i will have for my case. I also have a SSD lawyer that will be going along with me as well.

Right now i'm 40% SC, 0% hearing loss, 10% tinnitus, and 30% PTSD with the VA, but have an appeal in for that. I'm young, at 26 years old, and haven't worked since 07 due to my service connection, dealing with it day to day sucks. My psychologist told me to write down how i think PTSD affects my work, relationships, and daily life and he'd write me a letter, will the letter need a GAF score in it or does SSD use that? All my evidence is coming from my VA file that they have already, i just have a bit more to add with these letters. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!

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I knew my age and VA percent would factor in. I didn't expect a SSD hearing so soon though. My lawyer has helped someone i know that is 26 as well, he had his hearing in August and was granted SSD about 2 months later with full backpay. But he also had TDIU from the VA before his SSD hearing. What are Residual Capacity Forms?

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I should have typed Residual Functional Capacity forms (RFCs) which are used filled out by providers to show Social Security what limitations you have, and why you should be considered disabled. If you do a search on them, you can find that there are two types: Mental and Physical - Click on the link below for the post about them:

Edited by Bonzai
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